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King Crux
New member
Username: Kingcrux31

Post Number: 1
Registered: 6-2008
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2008 - 3:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

How's life over there?

(Message edited by admin on June 09, 2008)
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Arial
Intermediate Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 226
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Monday, June 09, 2008 - 4:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well that's a pretty broad question. In many ways life is good, in some not so good, as with any other place. Maybe you could tell what it is that you want to know. If you want efficient and non-frustrating government, you might be better off wherever you are. If you're looking for sweet people and beautiful country, that's another thing. So the answer to your question is: It all depends!
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Ana Lara
New member
Username: Elvislover

Post Number: 2
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, June 09, 2008 - 3:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I was in Argentina (from the US) for two months and after one month I was crying, literally, to come back to the US. It is indeed a beautiful country. I was in San Rafael, Mendoza on the west part of Argentina near Chile. It is a small town and it is evident that it is in a 3rd world country. It is more obvious that the government is not doing their part there. Half the town has dirt roads in a town where there is a lot of tourism. Where does that income go? Arial is on the dot, the government is not so efficient and it was extremely frustrating to not see "things done." My husband is from over there and he says it is a buracracy. His grandma was kept in the hospital for a whole day when she was supposed to be released that morning only because she had to wait for the floor doctor to come back to work "sometime" that evening to give her a prescription!! I had to wait for an Express shipment from the US for 2 weeks when I should have gotten it in 5 days. The Customs man tried to give me excuses and tell me only Express shipments came fast and when I told him mine was he didn't know what else to say. There are many, countless examples I could give you of the non-efficient government and unless you can easily adapt, it will be difficult. Maybe if I had been in a larger city with more things and places to go, I would have liked it more. Oh, and be ready to hang around from 12pm to 4:30-5:00 when everyone closes for lunch and "siesta". But on the other hand, it is a nice thing to sit down and have lunch with the family. It is a place where the family is very united.
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Arial
Intermediate Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 228
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Tuesday, June 10, 2008 - 12:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ana, of course you are on target. But some of the things you mentioned are things I actually like about Argentina. The problem is that when government does much stuff, it costs a lot of money and WE are the ones that have to pay for it. I like the low cost of living in Argentina and so I am very happy with those things. I can travel over dirt roads just fine. Dirt roads add to the character of the place! I think the tourist businesses that make all that money just might spend it on their own families! Isn't THAT a novel idea?

I do wonder if you were suffering from culture shock. I don't see Argentina as quite that "third-world." Maybe it is and I just can't see it. And I am familiar with San Rafael. Just my opinion, of course. Or maybe I am used to it. (And if you think dirt roads are bad, you should hang around for a San Rafael hail storm!) My first time out of the U.S. was to Belize at the invitation of one of my sons. He had not been out of the country before (as far as I can remember) and neither had I. In five days I could not WAIT to return to the U.S. He was the same. He said, "All I want is iced tea, toilet paper in the restrooms and American women!" We were both experiencing culture shock. It's pretty normal.

But that was long ago and many months spent outside the country--away. When I land in Argentina today I am at home. More so than most countries. I think it may be because, of most of the places I have visited, the people seem most like me. I cannot explain it. I can just say that is how I feel. I can relate to them. Plus they are intelligent, educated, and they THINK!

However, Argentina is not for everyone. I certainly don't want to encourage anyone to come to Argentina that does not belong there. But if you like it, perhaps you should come one or two times more before you make up your mind. Also enlisting a friend or family member to go along with you might make a big difference.
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Ana Lara
New member
Username: Elvislover

Post Number: 3
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Tuesday, June 10, 2008 - 1:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I was indeed suffering from culture shock. I admit it. San Rafael didn't seem like the place for me at 28 to consider moving to. I did like the tranquility, the scenery, and being close to family. Doing things together. I've heard of those hail storms too! =) And the cold winters in San Rafael. The dirt roads in winter/raining season, I heard, was not pretty. I do plan to go back many times more. I think eventually I could get used to it. I could move to San Rafael when I get close to retiring. It be a very nice place to just relax. That I have told my husband. He wants to move back eventually. We will see.

The cost of living is comfortable though when moving over there or just vacationing. There were things that are common in the states that are not in San Rafael at least. It might not be soooo much 3rd country but it is not close to the US at all, not even Mexico I think. I don't want to discourage anybody either, but I'd recommend spending 2 or 3 months at least in Argentina to see what you'd be getting into. Just my insight and experience.
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Michelle Alison
New member
Username: Michellealison

Post Number: 3
Registered: 7-2008
Posted on Monday, July 28, 2008 - 12:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

To me third world is having no running water, no electricty and no toilet facilities - these are what I found in West Africa. After two years in Argentina, I can say that dirt roads do not make a country third world. I always tell people that Argentina is a developing country, with one foot firmly in the first world.

A united family is more important than all the latest technology, although it is now becoming more widely available. I love seeing families enjoying the beach and socialising.

Michelle

PS There are areas in Mar del Plata where the residents want to keep dirt roads - less traffic and more rustic..........
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Robert Alexander
New member
Username: Imaginearg

Post Number: 2
Registered: 7-2008
Posted on Monday, July 28, 2008 - 1:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I first fell in love with Argentina years ago while living in the northwest. My wife is a native of western Argentina. After school and a few years of work back in the USA, we decided to come back earlier this year to Argentina.

We are now in Mendoza. No, Argentina is not perceived as "third world" here in the city. In fact, there are many luxuries here that are not common across Latin America.

Still, there are very impoverished communities in the country. Above all else, there are always concerns about the government and bureaucracy that define this country. However, you must look beyond that (when possible) and remember the beauty of the culture - the food, the dance, the plazas, etc.

While there are many "dirt roads", Salta is still the charming cultural cradle of this nation - in my humble opinion.

-Wade
http://imagineargentina.blogspot.com/
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Michael Alan Shirley
New member
Username: Mashirley35

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 8:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Robert Alexander,
I have been in both cities.Have you driven from Mendoza to Salta? What's it like? Is the drop off charge excessive for a rental car? Michael
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Robert Alexander
New member
Username: Imaginearg

Post Number: 4
Registered: 7-2008
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 9:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Michael -

Yes, but not in my own car. It has been clearly cheaper to take a local bus - no, not with chickens or cattle :-) The luxury bus lines have comfortable seats (which recline into beds), carpeted floors, flat screen televisions, dinner, and of course a blanket and pillow. Be sure to ask "arriba/adelante" for the best ride.

Based on my clients, the drop-off fee can be quite expensive.

The trip in itself is wonderful: San Juan, La Rioja, Catamarca. While not major cities, you will get a look into the other provinces. You should plan to stay in Tucuman at least a night or so to hang out in San Miguel - this is a large city, very populated, and the last stop before Salta.

-RWA
http://imagineargentina.blogspot.com/

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