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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1474
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 1:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

On looking for information about children traveling alone with one parent (departing the US), I came across some great -and updated- information from the US dpt. of State. Check the link for the source. Worth it.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1 130.html

The information is pretty accurate. I only disagree with the part of domestic flights being fairly reliable. Compared to the US, flights in Argentina are many times a lottery. Briefly, the page mentions:

- 270,000 American citizen visitors for 2007
- U.S. citizens do not need a visa for visits of up to 90 days for tourism and business.
- Most dual nationals are permitted 60-day visits.
- Dual nationals who stay beyond their permitted time are required to depart on an Argentine passport.
- American citizens wishing to enter Brazil are required to obtain a visa in advance from the Brazilian Embassy or consulate.
- Drivers frequently ignore traffic laws and vehicles often travel at excessive speeds.
- Demonstrations are common in metropolitan Buenos Aires and occur in other major cities, as well. Protesters block streets, highways, and major intersections, causing traffic jams and delaying travel.
- The preferred option for travel within Buenos Aires and other major cities is by radio taxi or "remise" (private car with driver).
- U.S. driver's licenses are valid in the capital and the province of Buenos Aires, but Argentine or international licenses are required to drive in the rest of the country. For further information, please contact the Argentine Automobile Club, Av. Libertador 1850, 1112 Capital Federal, telephone (011)(54)(11) 4802-6061, or contact the Embassy of Argentina as listed in the above section on Entry Requirements.

ABOUT DUAL NATIONALITY (I have been looking for this information for years!)

The concept of dual nationality means that a person is a citizen of two countries at the same time. Each country has its own citizenship laws based on its own policy.Persons may have dual nationality by automatic operation of different laws rather than by choice. For example, a child born in a foreign country to U.S. citizen parents may be both a U.S. citizen and a citizen of the country of birth.

A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.The U.S. Government recognizes that dual nationality exists but does not encourage it as a matter of policy because of the problems it may cause. Claims of other countries on dual national U.S. citizens may conflict with U.S. law, and dual nationality may limit U.S. Government efforts to assist citizens abroad. The country where a dual national is located generally has a stronger claim to that person's allegiance.

However, dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country. They are required to obey the laws of both countries. Either country has the right to enforce its laws, particularly if the person later travels there.Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. citizenship.Most countries permit a person to renounce or otherwise lose citizenship.
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Raymond White
New member
Username: Patos

Post Number: 1
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 9:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto, Thanks for the informative site.
The requirement to have an international driver's license has caused me some concern. We are leaving Feb. 7 and will arrive in Santiago, Chile on Feb. 8th. After 3 days in Santiago we have arrainged to rent a car, and have permission from the Avis to take it into Argentia. We are driving to Mendoza and then down to San Martin and Villa Angostura and then back into Chile.
We were in San Martin and Villa Angostura 3 or 4 years ago and rented a car and drove it into Chile also. Nobody every mentioned anything about an international drivers license.
I checked a web site that said they can issue them but it takes three or four processing days and that doesn't include the day or two that it would take to get the info together and send it.
If you are driving into Argentina and don't have one is anybody likely to not allow us in?
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MIchael Calero
Member
Username: Michael795

Post Number: 56
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 10:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just for your information, international Driver's license can be obtain at AAA office on the spot.

Hope that helps.
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Raymond White
New member
Username: Patos

Post Number: 2
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 11:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Michael,
I'll head down there tomorrow.
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WTMendoza.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 117
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 11:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Raymond,

Just because noone mentioned anything 3 or 4 years ago, and just becuase noone may or may not mention anything this time when you go, doesn't mean that by chance someone may actually enforce something that is on the books. Better be safe than sorry - good luck and have a great trip - cheers
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1477
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 8:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Like WTM said. Chances are you will be fine but it won't hurt to get an international license, specially if AAA can grant you one quickly.
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WTMendoza.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 118
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 9:17 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto - I forgot to mention thanks for posting that info at the beginning message...you would not beleive how many Americans and Argentines I run across that are convinced that that USA does not allow dual nationality. Just last week a USA immigration lawyer visiting here in Mendoza tried to convince me it was not allowed...I already knew better but how could I convince the guy - I politley referred him to the the Strate Department website but he was pretty much offended by that point..LOL
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Raymond White
New member
Username: Patos

Post Number: 5
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Monday, February 04, 2008 - 11:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

By the way, I contacted the Centro de Informacion Turistica and asked about an international drivers license. The lady responding said that I don't need an international driver's license in Argentina.
But in the meantime both my wife and I went to AAA and got them in about 15 minutes. They charged $21 for AAA members. So I guess we are set either way.
My photo looks like I had just drank a bottle of Malbec.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1498
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 05, 2008 - 9:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

> like I had just drank a bottle of Malbec.

Well, you will soon try some of the best varietals in the world as I understand the foot of the andes is a priviledge area with a perfect combination of weather/water/soil for growing Malbecs.

One common theme in Argentina is that you may get different answers from different people for the same subject. That is, from people that are supposed to know. Best not to take anyone's word so you did the right thing getting the international license.

Good luck on your trip!
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Alejandro Fretes
New member
Username: Afretes

Post Number: 3
Registered: 1-2008
Posted on Wednesday, February 06, 2008 - 9:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I rented a car for 2 weeks in Bs. As. and I used my Canadian driver's license.

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