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Spartaco
New member
Username: Spinsk

Post Number: 7
Registered: 8-2007
Posted on Friday, September 07, 2007 - 5:39 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

hey all, do you need to have a formal visa before you goto argentina? I was told not, just the normal 90 days tourist stamp you get on arrival. Is that true? Also, how hard is it to get a resident visa? Ciao.

Spartaco.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1277
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, September 07, 2007 - 10:11 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

True. No visa requirements for american citizens. Residency... mmmh, probably as hard as getting it in the USA. BUT, there is less pressure for this in Argentina. If you check the forum there are a number of members that have learned to do as much, almost as if residents... search the board for "CDI" and select "whole words only" and you will find many threads about it.
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WelcomeToMendoza.com
New member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 14
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Saturday, September 08, 2007 - 7:31 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well, technically all visitors here need a visa and in the current case of a USA citizen, you are automatically granted (stamped in your passport) a tourist visa at immigrations upon arrival that las for 90 days. If you stay over the 90, you can choose to rewnew it, within 90 days, at the neartes border, at the immigration office, or just pay the low penalty when you actually do leave.

Resident Visa - always best to pursue this thrugh your local Argentine conuslate closest to the city where you live in your home country. Try to ge it before you actually ove here. This is crucial. You can pursue it here, but it will take longer and more grief.

"Quick" shortcuts are marrying an Argentine or having a baby here.

Most pursued methods are retirement and fixed-income resident visas.

Here is a fairly good current link for current requirements
http://www.argentina.gov.ar/argentina/portal/pagin as.dhtml?pagina=19

but in the end follow the requirements of the closest consulate near you in your home country.

good luck
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 434
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 3:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Getting married to an Argentine citizen is not so quick.
You still have to go through immigration, show Apostiled birth certificates and divorce papers if divorced, five year apostiled criminal backgournd check, marriage license, and some other minor red tape paperwork.
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Kirk Afshar
New member
Username: Love_argentina

Post Number: 8
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 4:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

well if some one was born over seas which they use other then latin letters their birth certificate and divorce paper must be translated and notorized by Argentinian embassy in their home land.and also have a criminal record check as well be notorized in their country by argentinian consulate.
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WelcomeToMendoza.com
New member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 19
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 4:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

getting a Argentine resident visa from a Argentin consulate in the USA is fairly streamlined - if you married in the USA.
In my case I brought my future wife to the USA (much to her father's horror) on a Fiance visa..which was obtained by her from the USA embassy in BA. For her it was a lot of paperwork and hassle...then years later I applied for my Argentine permanent resdiency visa through an Argentine consulate in the USA - very straightfoward and standard documents requird - review, stamp, stamp again, done...visa in hand within 60 days of application, before moving here. I did have to go stand in line at Registro Civil in BA and get my DNI though, that was lot's of non-fun.
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 439
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 4:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The paperwork, birth certificate etc from a foreign country must have an apostile. In the US the state issues the Apostile for the birth certificate and divorce papers if they are necessary.
The translation of the papers and the Apostile can be done by a, for want of a better word, certified translator.
How do I know this. I did it four years ago.

From the State of Kentucky I got a certified copy of my birth certificate from the Bureau of Vital Statistics and an Apostile issued by the Secretary of State's office.

From the State of Floirda I got a certified copy of my last divorce and an Apostile from the Secretary of States office.

The five year criminal background was done by the local police. It did not have to have an apostile.

The documents had to be translated into Spanish. I had them done by a translator there in Buenos Aires. The translations had to be stamped by another agency of which I do not remember the name.

Immigration in Bahia Blanca is small but has a tiny line whereas the one in Buenos Aires is horrendous.
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WelcomeToMendoza.com
New member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 20
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 - 8:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Tom, - I also had all my stuff tranlated in BA, even from California via email and postal EMS - saved a TON of money (compared to Califoria supposed translators) and also gave the argentine consulate what they wanted: stuff translated by graduates of the colegio of traductores in BA: that stamp you refer to is the actual colegio stamp that a graduate must obtain from the colegio to leaglize the document - on top of it, the overseas consulates consider this very streamling factor of the process, so they appreciate it also..win/win.
For anybody that tries this method, I reccomend giving this method at least 10 to 15 day business lead time to get you tranlated documents in hand in your home country and be prepared to sends nice scans of the originals to a translator and western union money to him/her with faith. The list of translators are on their web site colegio de traductores buenos aires
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A. D. Hudgens
New member
Username: Hijo_de_tejas

Post Number: 12
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 2:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

ToMendoza, did you email the scanned documents to BA for translation or did you send the original documents? I don't trust sending the original and have sent electronic copies (files) and good prints to translator but she is reluctant to stamp or leaglize the translation documents because she cannot attach the translation to the original. If she attaches to the copy and sends them to me and I attach everything to the originals, do you think this will work?

A.D. Hudgens
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WTMendoza.com
Junior Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 32
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 6:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I scanned them and emailed them. My translator had the same hesitiation, but it is the colegio de traductores that certifies thm, and they were okay with it. When I got the translations, I simply did the attaching from there. The consulate was thrilled these were translated in this method. No apostille needed, etc.
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larry Rogers
Member
Username: Larryr30

Post Number: 72
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 4:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

To those above that wish to answer:
I have a question that I'm sure has been asked, but I'm not about to look through the entire archive! O.k., I'm aware of all the different types of visas available, but is there a way to apply for residency without having to use one of the different types of visas (retirement, investment, entepeanurer etc...) Can't you just apply for residency here, Maybe some might be able to answer me.

THanks.....any input would be great. I would like to get the ball rolling as it's been a year since my landing here in Argentina and now it's about time to look deep into this subject!
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Adam Walker
Junior Member
Username: Adam_walker

Post Number: 44
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 5:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey larry - from my research, no...

They will only let yo legally into the country if you have a job with a firm here, or you have a fixed income already (maybe a house you own and rent out) or have capital to start your own business, and that is it!

Otherwise, it's crossing the border for you! or marry your chica ;)

I am meeting a lawyer soon, I will let you know if I find any other way.

If anyone knows any other way, please let us know!

Adam
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elina overstadt
New member
Username: Agustina

Post Number: 18
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 6:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Actually there is another way, and its the way we did it. It must be renewed every year but is easy if you have the vehicle to do this. Its called representative of Foreign Company. If you own a company abroad (can be a LLC, partnership etc) and can show proof of ownership, you can obtain a visa. There doesn't need to be actually business going on, just a legal entity. Proof of the company's good standing: showing Delaware Charter is current,no taxes in arrears, a letter from your partner in US saying you are working for him/her and certification by the Chamber of Commerce and the Argentine Consulate.
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Randy Feldhaus
New member
Username: Familiafeldhaus

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Tuesday, November 20, 2007 - 4:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My family and I are going to Argentina, but we are leaving on Jan. 5th, 2008. I am told this is not enough time to get a "financier" visa. If we enter with a tourist visa, how many times can a tourist visa be renewed by leaving the country? We are planning on staying for 1-2 years in B.A or Mendoza. Can we get a financier visa if we begin the process in Argentina? Thanks for any info.
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Adam Walker
Junior Member
Username: Adam_walker

Post Number: 48
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 5:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Well Randy, you can keep renewing the tourist visas, no problem... dont know much about the financier visa though, sorry.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1381
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 12:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am guessing here... but like any other immigration procedures you will probably be asked for documentation from origin that may also require apostille. Even if it might be possible to start it all in Argentina make sure to find out which papers you will need. An example, to request residence for my wife we may need to present among other things birth certificates with apostille, police records notarized and with apostille, etc...
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Randy Feldhaus
New member
Username: Familiafeldhaus

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Thursday, November 22, 2007 - 4:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks, is there an English source to read about the paperwork necessary for a financier residency visa, so I can get the proper copies before I go? I have the birth and wedding certificate and police records. If there is a website that has been helpful please let me know. I guess worse comes to worse we can just keep exiting the country every 90 days or so. I heard that without a 1 year visa it is harder to get a cell phone contract, utilities, bank acct etc...Does anyone have experience with this?
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A. D. Hudgens
New member
Username: Hijo_de_tejas

Post Number: 14
Registered: 8-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 24, 2007 - 7:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

WTMendosa.com You said ¨I did have to go stand in line at Registro Civil in BA and get my DNI though, that was lot's of non-fun.¨
I am in BA now with my retiro visa I received last week in Houston. I do not have an appointment with Registro Civil. Is appointment required? What may be ask of me and how much is the cost? My spanish is limited will it require a translator be with me? Anythimg you or anyone can tell me will be helpful. As you can tell I do not know what I am doing but I can not afford the price to have it all done for me by a consultant.
A.D. Hudgens
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Arial
Intermediate Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 111
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Saturday, November 24, 2007 - 9:45 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi A.D.

I know you are writing to Mendoza but I went through this process a little less than a year ago so I will give you my answer and Mendoza can do the same.

Yes you have to have an appointment. When I arrived in BsAs, the nearest appointment was 6 weeks later. I have to go again in March and this time I will ask my attorney to make the appointment before I go instead of waiting all that time in BsAs. But maybe they are not that backlogged now and it will not take that long for you.

And yes you will need a translator unless you speak some Spanish. Unless something has changed, they do not speak English. I speak a little Spanish but my attorney's assistant was on hand to translate for me. At first they would not let her go in but then when we had problems, they allowed her in. You have come this far, probably if you can just get someone to help you with interpretation you will be okay.

I was told that there would be an interview, but when we had the language problem, they just did a couple fingerprints again (I think to be sure I am really me), had me sign a couple of papers and it was all done. Then I had to wait a week or so for the official DNI. Good luck. I hope it all goes smoothly. Arial
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Arial
Intermediate Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 112
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Saturday, November 24, 2007 - 9:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

One more comment to answer your question. There is a charge at immigraciones. Sorry I don't remember what it is. The attorney (AFN) charged me $200 for their help with this particular step (to make the appointment and accompany me) but I can't remember what I had to pay at the cashier's window. It seems to me it might have been something like $35.00 but my recollection is pretty vague about that amount. It was not a huge sum. Arial
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1389
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 28, 2007 - 5:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Randy, is the financier visa the same as a 'business' visa? If so, here are the requirements from the argentine consulate in Miami. There is a phone number at the bottom if it is of any help...


Business Visa

Business visa requirements
All the documentation should be presented in original and photocopy

- Valid passport or re- entry Permit.
- One passport photo (1)
- Complete application form and sign in presence of a Consular Official
- Proof of Legal Status in United States of America (Visa or Residency Card)
- Round-trip ticket or Itinerary
- Letter (notarized) from employer explaining the purpose of the trip, work assigned, and approximate length of stay - including name, address, and telephone number of contact person in Argentina.
- Last Bank Statement and credit card (account number erased)
- Hotel reservation or contact person information including name, telephone number, and address during your stay in Argentina.

Fee: U$S 50.00 (ONLY MONEY ORDER)

Please contact our Visas Department to arrange an appointment.

Departamento de Visas
Tel. (305) 373-1889 ext. 211 Fax (305) 371-7108
Atención telefónica de lunes a viernes de 9 a.m. a 5 p.m.
Recepción de aplicaciones de 9 a.m. a 1 p.m.

======
I would not know what changes if starting all this in Argentina.
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WTMendoza.com
Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 66
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Wednesday, November 28, 2007 - 9:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Actually the financier visa is not the same as business visa..and yeah..if you do it from insiude Argentina, hunker down:-)

Roberto good point about referring to the consulate web site in their area - thats what it's all about.

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