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D. A. Gerdes
New member
Username: Discovery

Post Number: 1
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 4:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have two questions:

I have been offered a job in Buenos Aires that I am quite interested in taking. I need to put together a realistic budget for the cost of living in BA so that I am sure I am earning enough money. I'll live in a 1BR apartment, take the bus around if I can, and not own a car. However, I eat out frequently and also plan to go out tangoing quite a lot. Any clue about what my monthly costs might be would be helpful.

Additionally, I am curious about working visas. Are sponsored visas the only ones available or are there options? I can obtain a sponsored visa but might want to go another route in case the job doesn't work out.

Thanks in advance for your responses!
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Tom Woodson
Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 88
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 5:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

D.A.
How much do you want to spend for an apartment. It depends on where your work is going to be and how far you want to travel each day.

You can eat out for as little as $4 US up to $15-20 for a really expensive meal for one person.

If you spend 5 to 6 hundred a month on an apartment I think you could exist on $1000 US a month in Bs As.

You can transfer your work visa to a tourist visa by crossing the Rio de la Plata to Uruguay and come back and stay for 90 days and do it again for more time etc

Hasta luego
Tom
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Deby Novitz
New member
Username: Tangospam

Post Number: 5
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Monday, July 24, 2006 - 8:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am not sure what you mean by "enough money." Most people who are sent here by their companies or are hired by reputable international companies are given living allowances along with their visas. These people tend to save money as much of their expenses are paid for.

There are a lot of sham companies who offer people jobs and then when they get here, they have no real work or visa. You should make sure that you have enough money to live on if this turns out to be your situation. I have met several people who came here with only a couple of thousand and expected to be working for a recruiting company that would be paying them "well." They all had to leave as the jobs were not what they were pitched to be and they did not have enough to live on.

Keep in mind that it is not simple for a foreigner to get work here. If you do get a work visa it will be with the company that pulls it. It is not transferable. If you are here on a tourist visa then about the only work you can get is teaching English, along with everyone else. It is very difficult to make a living doing this.

You can always stay here on a tourist visa. I own my apartment, but I live on around $600 - $700 USD a month. I have no car. Life is much simpler here. I eat out, I dance tango, I go to the movies, theatre.
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Tom Woodson
Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 89
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Tuesday, July 25, 2006 - 1:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Deby
Good information.

I will be back in Argentina. There are some investors coming down for a look at some property.

I love Argentina.

hasta luego
Tom
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Marite Spruth
New member
Username: Inti

Post Number: 1
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Wednesday, August 30, 2006 - 10:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Guys,
I am sending you a link by Joseph Stiglitz an American economist with excellent credentials. "Nobel Prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz said on Friday the International Monetary Fund (IMF) was repeating the mistakes it had made in East Asia in Argentina and would only exacerbate the country’s economic downturn"....http://www.globalpolicy.org -- IMF Repeating Asian Mistake in Argentina

I remember I landed in Argentina soon after Menem was elected and reading articles praising his new economic measures in Times and the National Geographic. Mind you I am not an economist, but I told everybody it was not going to work. I had dinner with friends who were business people and were very lukewarm about my comments, only one of them said I was right. Luckily the Argentinians are very resilient and will always bounce back, it is amazing!!! I live in Sydney and they have one the highest teenage suicide in the world. How can you work this out?
Marite
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Stephen R. Barrell
New member
Username: Steve_b

Post Number: 1
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 - 1:49 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Forum, and fellow members!
The subject of work visas came up, reminding me that this is an important topic that I have not explored as part of my plan to move to Buenos Aires.

I'm a performing artist (classical music) and teacher with outstanding credentials. My colleagues in Buenos Aires tell me that I will have all the work I want.

Rumor has it that a few occupations may merit a less complicated visa than is usual, and that artist was one such occupation. Can someone either confirm this, and point me in the direction of appropriate information or, contrariwise, tell me to stop getting my facts from The National Inquirer? Thanks in advance. Steve
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 740
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 - 7:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Stephen welcome! Yes, go directly to the source. Much better than the National Inquirer. Read article 23, sub f and sub i. You will find special categories for artists and educators.

> Immigration Law

However, you will still need a lawyer. The fact that it is in black and white doesn't guarantee a smooth process. Probably just the opposite. Goood luck!
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 741
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 - 7:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Adding the fine print...

Immigration process
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kimberly adams
New member
Username: Kim

Post Number: 1
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 07, 2007 - 8:03 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

this is the very first time i have ever done any sort of chat or forum online - all very exciting ...

anyway, i'm planning on moving to b.a. unless otherwise deterred.

i lived in bolivia for three years, just got back to the u.s. after living in china for 4.5 years and ready for buenos aires.

while i'm a professional i don't mind teaching english to get started (actually quite welcome a non-stressful gig for a bit).

question: is it reasonable for me to assume i can go to b.a. and easily get english teaching jobs? i spoke with amcham and they said companies were always looking for people short term and provided work permits...(did i mention i don't have a w.p.?).

an argentine friend of mine said 2500usd was more than enough to come with - but that needs to last for apt./job search/life - so i'm thinking at least 3 mos. - what do you think????
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kimberly adams
New member
Username: Kim

Post Number: 2
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 07, 2007 - 8:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

ooops, forgot to add something...

1) can i rent an apartment without any formal documents?

2) do i have to have proof of leaving argentina when i enter (e.g. roundtrip ticket back to the u.s.)?
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1025
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 10:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kimberly welcome! Nice to have you here after your world pilgrimage... (I mean in the forum)

Your argentine friend should give you precise information such as exact, up-to-date apartment rentals, locations and such. Otherwise, that amount will not last you 3 months. In my last visit a few weeks ago I spotted some cheaper studios for say, $200/month but if they ask you 3X deposit (first, last and secured deposit) you will have an outflow of almost 1/4 of the money you are bringing. The shortest leases I saw were for 6 months and those were rare. What I am pointing to is that going to a large city with limited funds and hoping to last 3 months is perhaps unrealistic as there is a miriad of small inconveniences that will cost you money. A little here and a little there will start to add up. And this is only considering lodging. Another story will be the renting process for which you may need to present formal documents and a guarantor. Although you don't need to prove to anyone you will not be just a visitor (this is the easiest part, to just stay) staying for an extended time may imply having some sort of documentation to close specific deals such as... renting.

Not everything is bad news. You can certainly stretch those funds if you can solve your lodging dilemma. Can your friend accomodate you for a while until you find a place where you can rent 1 room? This will make things a lot easier.

I think what the amcham said is more of a general belief. Although not as bad as wishful thinking I am pretty sure they understated the supply side. There are many locals as well as foreigners who can and do teach english. Making a buck in BA is not that easy. Waiting tables could be an option -if you are open to it-. International restaurants where customer may tip at international rates (15% and in dollars) may not be that bad. Not to be dismissed even if you are a professional. And as a long shot, I would definitely contact the many grain companies and operators and offer them your experience in/with China as this is possibly your strongest asset and you may see little to NO competition. I don't what you did there but four years is plenty of time to have become acquainted with some aspects of their culture.

If you have specifics from your argentine friend post them here and I will be happy to look at the cold facts.
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Autumn Lively
New member
Username: Autumn

Post Number: 2
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 12:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Forgive me but I don't speak or read spanish(yet) can anyone point me to an english web site to answer visa questions.I have 6 kids and we are relocating to Argentina.I am trying to figure out visa issues.We will have an income ,a job in Argentina but it's paid from a company in Panama not Argentina plus from the US we have SSI(social security) and they don't want us living abroad and getting our SSI.So I don't want to break any laws but I have no issue bending them to suit us..any info would be wildly appreciated!
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 332
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 4:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Autumn and welcome to the forum
You say they do not want you to live abroad and get SSI.
Why is that. A lot of retires live outside the US and get their retirement and government income including VA benefits.

If you have direct deposit of your benefit checks you can use ATM's in Argentina.
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Autumn Lively
New member
Username: Autumn

Post Number: 3
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 4:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Tom,
I DO want to get our SSI,it's not retirement,it's death benifits my sons(step sons) mother died a few years ago and they are getting them but we were told if we reside outside the US we can no longer get them..!
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 333
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Thursday, March 08, 2007 - 8:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the information Autumn.
Is it the Social Security Administration that is telling you your step son cannot get the benefits if he lives outside the country?
If so have they given you any reason why?
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 76
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Friday, March 09, 2007 - 5:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Autumn, will you be keeping an "address" in the U.S.? If so then you are not formally living outside. We have reasons for keeping our address in the U.S. while living in Argentina. If you want we can talk more by email or p.m.

Laura
Moving to and Living in Argentina ebook
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 77
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Friday, March 09, 2007 - 5:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kimberly, you might be able to scrape by for 3 months on 2500, but there are thing you need to keep in mind. First, as Roberto said you'll have no guarantor, unless your friend owns property and will be your guarantor (the owner doesn't have to accept that though). So without a guarantor you will most likely be locked into a short term tourist rental which is legally supposed to be no longer than 6 months. The problem with the tourist rental is they are more expensive to rent, but it's a great way to see if you like it there and can make it work because you won't need to furnish it (and furnishing a rental in BA usually means buying your own fridge).

I've seen studios in the 500-600 range and one bedrooms 600-1000 all in US dollars by the way. This is for something decent but maybe or maybe not extravagent. My friend took this route last year and signed a 4 month lease while she determined if she wanted to stay or not.

By the way, teaching English is not really a great way to live there. You often get paid in pesos and it may not offer you the same standard of living you want.

This all said, 2500 US will give you your first 3 months to check it out, but you should have some money in reserve and a backup plan.

Hope this helps.
Laura
Moving to and Living in Argentina ebook
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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Bill Howard
New member
Username: Veritas01

Post Number: 19
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Friday, March 09, 2007 - 7:50 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Just a couple of quick points. Be careful with the government. If you receive SSI payments while living abroad and that is against the rules then once you are found out not only will the payments stop but the SSA will seek to recover any payments paid in the past from the moment you left the country. Not that they will find out. However, your social security number is part of your passport application. Does customs and immigration share info with SSA? Also you will need to file taxes in the US. In theory you must report all income, domestic and foreign. Now the IRS will know you live abroad and I know for sure the IRS and SSA share information.
If you were to report SSI income and foreign income I would have to think that a bell would go off in some program in the IRS computers. Let assume you can get past all of this.

You might want to consider Cordoba. Second largest city in Argentina. Nice quality of life. I believe the cost of living is less than Buenos Aires. My sister in law lives modestly on around 2000 pesos a month. No car. No travel really. She works for MCI as a customer service rep. Nice simple apartment. She pays around 500 pesos a month. Utilities are not bad. She eats at home mostly. She is young so it is still an adventure.

One question. Do you speak Spanish?
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Autumn Lively
New member
Username: Autumn

Post Number: 4
Registered: 2-2007
Posted on Friday, March 09, 2007 - 10:27 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ok I think I have good info about how to relocate and get the right visas for my family.

Temp financier visa.
We have to show an income such as a trust OR SSI...of aprox $900.00 us,it is renewed every year and on the 3rd year can apply for a different long term visa.I am still fact checking but sounds like the right one for our situation.
What I don't know YET is can it be for ALL of us since each one does not get $900,we get a bit morn then that a a whole family...so for the children I am not sure how that will work yet.
We don't need work visas because it is a family company we will be working for so all the money will be "under the table" so to speak,it could be shown as income if we need a work visa but the TFV sounds better..bending here..bending
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 337
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Friday, March 09, 2007 - 4:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

For clarification only due to the nature of taxes by law the IRS is not supposed to share tax information with other agencies of the government or any person other than the taxpayor. The tax payor can give permission in writing to the IRS to allow others to see tax information.
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kimberly adams
New member
Username: Kim

Post Number: 3
Registered: 3-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2007 - 12:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi All,

thanks for answering my questions...

as I'm getting older just plopping myself somewhere hoping it all works out (which it always does) is not the most mature way to deal with a move - love the excitement but need to be a bit more organized about things...sooo thanks for the guidance.

when i get there how do i go about finding someplace to hang my hat while i get a feel for the place? it's my understanding if i go to a rental agency i'm paying a lot more than necessary sooo who's the man in the dark alley that i see (joke - want something clean, legal etc.)?

someone suggested i could waitress instead of teach english - do i need a work permit for this???

to date i'm speaking with some NGO's for doing HIV work but that will take time and I want to work while I'm waiting so i really don't care what it is - just needs to pay the bills.

where do you suggest i stay when i arrive - not quite into the hostel thing - simple, clean, well located and cable (need to adjust for a few days at least!)

i speak spanish - don't know if that means anything.

my friend in BA will probably take care of everything for me but want to be independent and have all my ducks in a row - she has better things to do than hold my hand...

kimberly
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1029
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2007 - 12:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

There are a few decent and cheap hotels that are centrally located and you can probably make some arrangements for weekly stay until you find something more permanent. In my large three moves from country to country and state to state I used no more than 3 weeks in hotels until I finally settled permanently. Although this made looking for a space my full time job at those times. Check with King hotel in Florida and Corrientes. We always send our clients there who want no-frills, cheap, clean (and small) accomodations.

Reading /speaking spanish is an advantage as you can get the classifieds from a Saturday newspaper and look up for cheaper rentals than through an agency. As I said, a full time job.

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