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Gayle
Member
Username: Flaka

Post Number: 70
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 11:23 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

My husband and I both have gun permits in the US and own guns for home protection. In light of the crime in BA, can you own a gun for home protection? This is of importance in considering relocation to Argentina. Since criminals have guns it would be only logical that private citizens can also.
Thank you all.
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Carmen
Junior Member
Username: Carmen

Post Number: 28
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 11:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes you can. Go to RENAR, that is the Registro Nacional de Armas.

They have specific requirements in order to provide you a License.

http://www.renar.gov.ar/tramites/3.asp

(Message edited by admin on November 01, 2009)
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Carmen
Junior Member
Username: Carmen

Post Number: 29
Registered: 9-2005
Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 12:19 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I forgot to say that to obtain permission for firearms in Argentina is a different procedure if you are Tourist or you are a Permanent Resident.

With a Tourist Visa you will need to contact Argentinaīs Consulate at your country of origin.
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Gayle
Member
Username: Flaka

Post Number: 71
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 12:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Carmen,

Thank you so much for the information. I will check out that web site.
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Bill Howard
Member
Username: Veritas01

Post Number: 73
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 2:18 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My father in law who is Argentine and ex-Argentine navy has always had a handgun at home. He just recently had to make an 8 hour drive to BA from where he lives to renew his permit. Guns are quite common in Argentina and many business and home owners own them. It amazes me that despite this break ins and buglaries are epidemic in Argentina. You would think the prospect of meeting a homeowner with guns blazing would make people think twice but I guess it is worth the risk to some people.

Of course owning a gun and using a gun are two different things. Foreigners who shoot nationals will always be in some degree hot water no matter how criminal the victim. This is common in many countries in the world. I don't doubt you are careful and would only use the weapons if threatened with deadly force but remember you are a foreigner and the rules of law and liability could be different for you.
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AMARAGGI
Junior Member
Username: Amar

Post Number: 34
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 5:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I stongly recommend watching Michael Moore's film "Bowling for Colombine". I like Bill's comment: "Of course owning a gun and using a gun are two different things". So if you are not going to use your gun in Argentina, please don't bring it. Most probably it will end in hands of people who could really use it and maybe kill some people.
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 478
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 6:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have brought Americans into Argentina for hunting. They bring their own weapons. They have to get paperwork from the airlines saying they are carrying a weapon on board the airplane even though it has to be stored in the baggage compartment.
Once they get to Ezezia(sp?) they would get their guns from baggage and then go to the police office their at the airport and get a permit. They had to show thier weapon and the documents that allowed them to transport the weapon on the airplane and then paid a fee which was 300 pesos for a permit.
The permit required them to take the weapons with them when they left the country. Upon leaving the weapons were again placed onboard the plane in the luggage hold. Fairly simple.
There has never been a problem bringing hunting weapons into the country. The key word is hunting weapons. If they were AK47's or M-16's or some other assault weapon or machine gun, I think and hope there would be a problem. Real hunters don't use these kinds of weapons anyway.
I know a lot of people in Argentina who own weapons. Everyone of them have them for hunting. I have traveled to the country many times and stayed there for months on end. I cannot recall ever hearing of anyone being killed buy a gun. It probably happens but I have not heard of it.
I think the citizens are a little more civilized there than in the US where property is more important than human lives.
There is an old saying that guns do not kill people, people kill people. I have been around guns all my life and I have yet to see one stand up and shoot someone. With that said, I know, having served in the Army where I was taught to kill humans with weapons(we did not call them guns) it is fairly simple to kill a human being with one. But the Army uses M16's and various other fully automatic weapons.
From what I understand Argentina has very strict gun laws. Viva la Argentina.
I have visited gun stores in Buenos Aires and Gutache. They carried hunting rifiles and pistols. I do not recall seeing any fully automatic weapons for sale in either one.
Argentina has excellent hunting opportunities but I know very few Argenines who hunt although I do know some. The hunting Estancias where the hunters who came with me hunted had special licenses issued by the province and federal government.
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 479
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 6:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a new website which isn't completed but you can go there if you like. www.arghunt.com

Foreign hunting in Argentina is expensive as it is with most all safari type hunts. The last two hunters I took there spent over $15000 US dollars for a 7 day hunt.
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 480
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 9:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

also Gayle
I think home invasions are pretty much an American thing. Invading armies all over the world have histories of home invasions but that is war. I think since we are almost always at war some have forgotten that home invasions are a warlike action.
I do not recall hearing of any home invasions done with or without guns in Argentina. Who knows, maybe it has happened.
I just thought of someting. During the Malvineas war I don't recall even the Argentine army invading private citizens homes.
Interesting.
If you want a great place to live where you don't need a gun to protect your home, I recommend Argentina.
You might have a minor concern about kidnappings. Certainly not too concerned. From what I have heard the kidnappers do not invade the home but pick someone off the street. Being a civilized country the kidnappers follow the rules. You do not kill the person you have kidnapped, feed and house the victum in safe conditions and have at least one barbeque while the victum is being held. I love the empanadas personally.
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 481
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Sunday, November 01, 2009 - 10:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wow, I obviously have lost touch with the common man in Argentina.

After reading this blog and making some comments and then doing a little research it sounds like Argentina is in free fall.

My how times change.
http://ferfal.blogspot.com/search/label/Argentina

this is an intersting article where a guy is robbed and then poisened and another guy is robbed by the police.

So Madam Kerchiner is socializing all the money and things are going south, no pun intended at a rapid pace.

Gayle, you probalby should start looking at Mexico where medicare and social security can be paid and used and there is an excellent rate of exchange and a huge US retirement population.
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Gayle
Member
Username: Flaka

Post Number: 72
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Monday, November 02, 2009 - 12:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Bill and Tom,

Thank you for the info on guns. We would only want guns in the home if we decided to relocate permanently to Argentina.

Tom, I read the blog. The book sounds very informative. Socalizing pensions is pretty scary. Any particular places in Mexico that are affordable and where there are some English speaking people? We are planning on visiting again next May since my husband has his mother living in BA.
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Arial
Advanced Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 336
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 - 7:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

As Tom says, there is a procedure for owning a firearm in Argentina. While people are allowed to bring in firearms temporarily for hunting, the agent I am using for shipping says that even he could not import a firearm permanently into Argentina. So it appears (unless someone has other info) that if you already have firearms it is necessary to leave them behind. (HOWEVER, in Argentina anything could be possible if you know the right people!)

This is a bit of a heartbreak for me since about the only thing I have of my husbandīs that is lasting, other than two kids, is his firearms. I am even a certified firearms instructor but they didnīt even think that credential would do it. Things do change and if you want to bring firearms though I suggest you verify this.

Just as a matter of interest, I once saw an AK-47 advertised in an Argentina newspaper. I didnīt call on it but thought it interesting.
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Arial
Advanced Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 337
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 03, 2009 - 8:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

WOW, Tom I went to that link you gave and read what was written. I am planning to be in BsAs full time after the first of the year. I donīt care for big cities, but I have family across the river in Uruguay. This is SCARY. I once read an article by an Argentine that wrote about home invasions in the country after the crash. He advised not to move into a country place but to live where you have close neighbors. I posted and asked if anyone knew if it was true and no one responded. When I arrived in Argentina in 2005 I actually saw one or two well-dressed people scraping food onto a plate out of a dumpster so I know it was very bad. If you guys remember me, I lived in Bariloche with absolutely no problem--ever.
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AMARAGGI
Junior Member
Username: Amar

Post Number: 35
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Saturday, November 07, 2009 - 2:21 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Look at what happened this week in the US. I hope this does not come in Argentina. Of course the gunmen possessed their arms "to protect their families" etc. etc.
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Arial
Advanced Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 338
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 9:42 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Of course a military guy is going to have access to firearms. But he may have been a suicide bomber with a different idea as well BUT . . .

What many people have not heard is that every single mass murder that we have had in the US in the last few years has been by people on psychotic drugs for depression. Prozac being a major offender. A doctor I know of says that the side effects listed for some of these drugs actually include homicide and suicide. And yet they are still being prescribed for depression. It kind of makes you wonder!

The Columbine killers were on those drugs, the mom that drowned her 5 kids was. A friend of mine going through crisis was given something like that by a therapist and said when he took it it was all he could do to resist tearing down all the shelves in the parts room where he worked. He said he was barely able to maintain control, it worked exactly the opposite as it was supposed to. His brother, intent that he should take the drug, decided to try it himself just to prove his brother wrong, and had the same reaction. Maybe it is a chemical situation with two brothers but nevertheless the second brother agreed the first should discontinue it.

It incenses me that these drugs continue to be given to people who are depressed when they can make people dangeorus not only to themselves but to others. This guy was a psychiatrist, depressed, and I betcha he was on something. That is not an excuse, but is an indictment against something other than firearms.

Incidentally my niece and her husband are at Ft. Hood. I am intensely grateful that they are safe. But it does NOT make me think firearms are the problem. It does make me think that drugs with side effects should be discontinued (no matter what it costs the drug companies!!!! Thatīs their business risk!) I have asked my niece to let me know if she gets information on this.
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Gayle
Member
Username: Flaka

Post Number: 73
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Monday, November 09, 2009 - 10:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Arial,

I agree with you completely. We are becoming a "pill" society believing that our problems or our pain will be solved with pills. As you say, some medications have worse side effects than others. Facing one's issues can be painful but we should try to do so without drugs if possible.
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Arial
Advanced Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 339
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 10:02 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks, Gayle. But not "are becoming" but "have become!"

In 1999 I was diagnosed with a tumor the size of an orange and scheduled for surgery post haste! I had seen an M.D. on TV months earlier who recovered from breast cancer by changing to a healthy lifestyle, though she almost died in the process. I was so weak at the time my brother had taken me to his home and I mostly lay on their couch through the day. We agreed together that I would try the same program as the doctor for three months. If I was not improved I would have the surgery. I never had the surgery, three years later I went back just to check and be sure the tumor was not growing. It was gone. In the process my skin cancer (basil cell carcinoma) spontaneously cleared up and my painful arthritis also disappeared and today I bounce out of bed in the morning with no pain anywhere.

Today, I am on absolutely no medication and in good health. I eat NO packaged foods, thus avoiding the preservatives, MSG and other chemicals our bodies were never designed to process. I rarely eat anything with sugar in it since sugar is a major cause of inflammation in the cardiovascular system (one cause of high cholesterol as the body tries to repair the damaged blood vessels) and so on. I find it reprehensible that Americans have become such wimps that if you suggest they fix their health problems instead of papering over them with pills, they moan and say they could never do it. How can there be hope for a country that can't even handle a change of lifestyle if it means they can regain their health? That is the question I sometimes find myself asking as I sit outside Wal-Mart watching all those overweight people waddle in.
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Tom
Senior Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 560
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Monday, August 01, 2011 - 10:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Argentina, My website is not 100% but it tells some of the story. I want to sit up a blog but I am not sure how to do it.
I am pc challenged me thinks.
again it is www.arghunt.com

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