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Christopher Henson
New member
Username: Sandiegochris

Post Number: 18
Registered: 7-2007
Posted on Friday, December 14, 2007 - 8:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Can anyone provide me with information regarding the process of getting a CDI please? Thanks in advance.
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 110
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Friday, December 14, 2007 - 8:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Christopher, It's more just headache than anything else and knowing the little ins and outs of what to watch our for or expect.

One thing I will say is that it's far easier to obtain your CDI when you live in Capital as opposed to Zona Norte or many other areas outside of Capital. We went through hoops in Zona Norte and were never successful and we even went so far as to pay someone to help which was a joke. So we switched over to a friend's address in Capital and went to the one near Palermo Hollywood and it was a breeze and the lady was nice to boot :-)

Laura
Ebook Moving to and Living in Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com
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WTMendoza.com
Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 76
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Friday, December 14, 2007 - 9:24 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Here in Mendoza it's about a 1/2 day process - but budget that whole 1/2 day...in the morning:-)(smiley)
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Melanie berry
New member
Username: Whiterabbit

Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 8:46 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Firstly, a great site and so helpful. I am also trying to get a CDI, in bariloche. Do I have to go to the police station? Do I have to take 2 people with me?
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Bob Frassinetti
Member
Username: Frassinetti

Post Number: 53
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 9:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

An insight on Argentine ID codes: Personal ID, Work ID, CDI, etc…



While in the States your drivers’ license will be perfectly accepted as an ID in front of the police, the bank, etc, in Argentina identifying yourself in front of authorities, banks, etc is different. Here’s a brief insight on the local identification system for travelers, newcomers, relocating individuals and new residents…



If you’re traveling, like everywhere else in the world, your Passport is your ID. You will need it to get into the country in customs but it will be useful in many other cases. Of course, you will have to show it when checking in at any hotel, B&B or lodge. In many cases you will have to present it when purchasing anything with your credit card. If you feel uncomfortable carrying your passport, you can easily take a photocopy around the city, that will be enough.





Argentines personal ID number is the same for their Passport, National Identification Document (DNI) and Cedula de identidad (CI), issued by national authorities, being the National Registry of People the one issuing the DNI, and the Central Police Department issuing the Passport and CI.



In the case you’re wanting to do business, buy a property, etc, these are the options.



Argentines have two different ID for business issued by AFIP (public income federal administration) which is the Argentine version of the IRS. Both of these IDs require that the beneficiary presents their DNI.



CUIL (Codigo Unico de Identificacion Laboral) is a Working Identification Code given to everyone who has been employed at least once. This is the code that will represent you in the National Pension system, and it is used by your employer to pay the employee taxes.
CUIT (Clave Unica de Identificacion Tributaria), this code is given to business owners, private practice workers such as professionals, and it’s a TAX code, necessary to engage in commercial activities, issue bills,


Foreigners wanting to engage in profitable activities or any sort of transaction such as purchasing a property or opening a local bank account, etc will need a local ID number other than their Passport. The ID you will need to get is the CDI, Calve de Identificacion, Identification Key. This ID serves the purpose of allowing you as a foreigner to engage in business and profitable activities and transactions. The number is issued by the AFIP with the assistance of the Police that issues a local validation of your passport.

CDI; you need a confirmed home address, this is done by the local police department, takes round 24 hours and is something in the order of Peso 15…. As far as its done here in Buenos Aires, you need no “witnesses” …… all the same when in the Police station, ask.



If you’re a foreigner wanting to temporarily live in Argentina your Passport, an extended stay permit-VISA- and CDI will allow you to live and work in Argentina legally.

However if you want to reside in Argentina you can get a DNI number as a foreign citizen. This ID is known as DNI Original. The process is neither expensive nor complicated, only time consuming. The first you have to do is go to the Civil Registry in your district, in Buenos Aires City you have to go personally to 155 25 de Mayo St, where is the National Registry of Persons. The fee to get this Id is of 15 pesos, they will take your photo and in sometime between a month and 90 days you will get your DNI.

Invest in all that Argentina has to offer from Museum quality Art to Fashion from Antiques to Real Estate, and enjoy living with Arts and Antiques and Travelling all Argentina, Chile or Uruguay for them ....... read all about it here: http://www.frassinetti.com Phone: +54 911 6965 1955 or in B's A's: 15 6965 1955



Bob Frassinetti
Buenos Aires Argentina
Travelling for art and antiques in Argentina, Chile or Urugauy.Apartment for Rent in BA
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WTMendoza.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 153
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 9:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Bob, don't forget that if you don't have a residential visa, you cannot apply for that DNI. And of coure, the resdiential visa is the tricky part. Nice pics!
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WTMendoza.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 154
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 9:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

By the way, if anyone needs a CDI in Mendoza, we have it down to an easy process that takes less than 2 hours (1 hour on day "1" and 1 hour in the early morning of day "2").
There is no need for a police certificate, and your hotel address will suffice if you have no other alternative. Included in this service is follow through to change your "address" to a new address at the right time in the future, which is crucial to the cause.
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Melanie berry
New member
Username: Whiterabbit

Post Number: 2
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 11:00 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

wow, thank you both for speedy answers. you have given me so much more information than i have managed to get in the last 6 weeks!! i'm going to try on monday. it seems quite straight forward after all... but if its not that easy i might think about heading to mendoza to get a cdi and then changing it to my bariloche address. it sounds as if that is what you are saying is also possible.
i love argentina and am so glad that i am here. what a great country
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Bob Frassinetti
Member
Username: Frassinetti

Post Number: 54
Registered: 1-2005
Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 6:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Argentina, Buenos Aires, San telmo ..........

Rare and incredible objects, furniture, books, toys, artworks… all those antiques and collectibles you dream of can be found in Buenos Aires.
Once upon a time Buenos Aires was a very small port city with very little population surrounded by one of the world’s most fertile lands. Not too far away there were several other populations with very different traditions to the Spaniards who had populated this portside area. As the city grew and the Porteñan society evolved many Europeans chose Argentina to be their home. They immigrated with all their possessions from every corner of the old continent. This flow from Europe to Argentina first began in mid 19th century, and has never stopped till now. At the same time, as the world evolved –wars, economical possibilities, inspiration, were many of the causes that help other people chose our country as their own.
All of these new immigrants that were coming from Europe (Western and Eastern), Middle East, Asia and Africa, as well as many other Latin American countries, brought with them all kinds of objects, from paintings to mirrors and combs, from decorative items to all kinds of furniture, and so on.

This brief history of immigration in Argentina might help those that don’t know our country to understand a bit about the eclectic variety of items that can be found in this beautiful city that is Buenos Aires (specially Buenos Aires because it has always been the main gate to our great and beautiful country). Many of them were brought in immigration ships, many others were sent to these families from their homelands, some others were imported, and some other ones were the result of business among relatives who lived in their homelands and these new immigrants that were building a life in our Pampas. Those valuable family objects some times due to hard economic situations, or may be because there was no one to inherit them, have taken a path towards flea markets, auctions or antiques shops.



During the last few years there has been a huge turn in our economy, the peso (local currency) has lost much of its value in relation to the dollar and the Euro, this situation has impacted in many areas of our everyday life. On the dark side one of the biggest consequences of this economic shift has been an intense flow of goods towards all kinds of markets, in order to keep on with a certain lifestyle. Therefore many families have found themselves in a situation were they had to sell many of their family’s goods. On the bright side this new valuation of the peso has made of Argentina a more appealing place to visit for foreigners, since its much cheaper than many other big international metropolis though still shows all its splendor in its culture, art, fashion and good sense of living.

Our local flea markets, open fairs and antiques shops are open history books that show this turns in our lives.

Plus, these are excellent places to shop for those items all art lovers dream of, as well as an excellent opportunity for art dealers that wish to offer their regular clients high class items at reasonable prices.

One of the most beautiful open air markets in the city is in the historical neighborhood of San Telmo, that’s open all day during Sundays, from very early in the morning to late in the afternoon. Surrounded by countless antiques shops that open their doors to the public all week long, this fair is just beautiful, with very good quality items… Bargaining is always an interesting possibility when acquiring these type of objects, always a plus to get what you want at the price you want to.

In the outskirts of the city, the Solano fair is one outstanding market where if you have a sharp eye for antiques you can find absolutely amazing treasures. Since this fair is very much for locals you can find all from old clothes, semi used house goods, and whatever people had and needed to sell… Its always better to visit this outskirts out of the tourists path fair with a local, best if you know what you want but don’t have much time and your Spanish is not very good.

Back to the city, one excellent flea market is the Dorrego Market, in the heart of Palermo, very nearby a great restaurants area, this market has all kinds of items. Its just a matter of walking around and talking with the local people that are very kind and would gladly help you in your quest.

On the other end of the city, during the weekends there’s an other kind of flea market in Peru abajo. Located in the beautiful residential area of Acasusso you will find this fair has all kinds of decorative items and furniture, one of its specialties are chandeliers at very reasonable prices… High class and good prices, one excellent combo!



These are the most representative fairs and markets in BA. There’s nothing you can’t get, you name it, they have it… And of course, these are excellent sights when touring through the city of tango, ‘cause there are many different street shows that weekly chose those locations to show their art: tango, puppeteers, street theatre, live music, plus all kinds of local street food to enjoy during your walk, there’s no way that can go wrong!

Bob Frassinetti
Buenos Aires Argentina
Travelling for art & antiques in South America...........Steam Engine train in Patagonia
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Melanie berry
New member
Username: Whiterabbit

Post Number: 3
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 10:18 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

well, police in bariloche were really unhelpful and told me that i couldn´t get a CDI before a DNI!! looks like a trip to mendoza might be on the cards. is it easy to then transfer it to bariloche? is it necessary to transfer? i have also had communication from a school where they want me to teach saying all i need is a CUIL number from ANSES...any thoughts?
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Melanie berry
New member
Username: Whiterabbit

Post Number: 4
Registered: 2-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 10:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

sorry, another question - which police do i go to to validate the passport and domicilio? federal or provincial?
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Tom
New member
Username: Tomatalki

Post Number: 20
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 11:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

This has nothing to do with CDI's or DUI's or anything Argentine but I thought it might be of interest. I am trying to get my birth cert apostilled. I live in Seattle and was born in NYC.

1. Send for certified birth certificate.
2. send certified birth certificate to notary dept in NYC. Get it back because I sent too much money. Send it again.
3. Send certified and notarized birth certificate back to NY to get it apostilled.

They don't work fast. This process has taken almost 3 months and I'm still working on it (I'm on step 2) I don't think it gets much worse.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1559
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 2:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

To Melanie.

I suggest that you make a phone call to Sean (WTM) before embarking on a trip. He is very helpful and will speed up your need for an answer. His contact information is on his website:

WTMendoza, LLC
Tel: inside Argentina 0261-524-4999
Mobile. inside Argentina: 0261-15-553-5735
Tel: outside Argentina +54-261-524-4999
Mobile outside Argentina: +54-9-261-553-5735
E-email: info "at" wtmendoza.com

I hope you don't mind, Sean.
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WTMendoza.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 158
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 4:34 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

No problem and thanks Roberto - we do offer this service for a $210 pesos fee.

It requires your presence 1 hour in the evening of "day 1" and 1 hour early in the morning of "day 2" in downtown Mendoza. It’s a stremalined process we have worked out with AFIP here in Mendoza, and it is desgned to avoid hassles you might get from the frontline folks at the customer service in AFIP.

The address on file could even be your hotel so this service includes follow through automatic reminders from us , every 3 months, to change your address to your property if you buy one.

Really this CDI number could be attained on your own by interacting with the AFIP yourself, if possible, or from a real estate office but the real estate office probably will only do it if you seem serious about buying one of their properties.

The advantage we offer is that 1) We streamline the process for you, with no obligation to buy any property of course, and 2) remind you automatically every 3 months via email about the ever important process of changing your address to a property you eventually do buy, if you do buy one in Argentina. Yes you can change your address to a different province., the CDI is a national number.

Again, if you speak Spanish well enough, and are able to navigate and hurdle regionalized traditions in the local AFIP office wherever you are in Argentina, you should be able to get your CDI number yourself without the cost of a service like ours. But we offer the service for those who want to save time and effort.

Remember the number also serves to buy vehicles and other property also, and serves to open up bank accounts in select banks here.

Melanie, I sure hate to see you make a trip to Mendoza just for a CDI number, but if you do then hopefully you have some fun, and get inside the highest sets of multiple peaks of the Andes mountain range of all of South America, right here in the Mendoza province. If you are coming through San Rafael, be sure to keep your eyes peeled for the mystical "3 picos de amor" in Uco Valley that are only seen from that road from San Rafael traveling northbound as you approach southern Uco Valley. These 3 peaks are over 16,0000 feet in altitude alone.
Good luck and have fun!

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