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Steven Leslie
New member
Username: Sleslie23

Post Number: 1
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 20, 2007 - 3:22 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi all,

First off, let me say thanks for all of the great information posted here. However, I haven't seen an exact answer to my question posted yet, which is:

What is the cost of living in BsAs for an Argentine? I ask this because I have the opportunity to be transferred from San Francisco to BsAs. My work will handle all of the visa/residency paperwork, but I will be paid in Pesos (much less than my currently salary). I am trying to determine what my monthly expenses will be. For what it's worth, the office is in San Isidro, so I assume that I'll have to live in Palermo/Belgrano.

Thanks very much,

Steven
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 960
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 22, 2007 - 7:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Steven, welcome!

I think this is difficult to assess. It will all depend on your lifestyle. A couple (with 2 kids) who are friends of mine told me not too long ago that they could cover all their expenses with usd $3000 a month, with an apartment/house fully owned. Not living large, but well, with a decent health coverage and good education for their children.

Others may need less whereas some may need more.

I have 2 general thoughts. Coming from San Fransisco, BA will look dirt cheap to you. However, being paid in pesos you are living money on the table and possibly impoverishing yourself. Negotiate for the equivalent in DOLLARS!
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Steven Leslie
New member
Username: Sleslie23

Post Number: 2
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - 5:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto,

Thanks for the information. I realize my question was a little vague. Being paid in dollars would be ideal, but is not an option if I go to Argentina. Basically, I'll probably end up breaking even the whole time I am there. Which I'll probably regret when I retire, but will enjoy now!

Here are a few more specific questions:

1) What are income taxes like in Argentina?
2) Is it easy/possible for an expat to find a non-tourist rental in BsAs?
3) Are flights within Argentina generally affordable to Argentines?
4) Is it easy to transfer peso out of Argentina to the US?
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Orlando Martinez
New member
Username: Bracsim

Post Number: 10
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - 6:52 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I make $3000 a month in the US and I`m living well in Florida, why move to argentina? As long as I know you live like a millioner with that king of money downthere, if you speak spanish you can find good deals in real state, just look around and dont buy nothing on the internet because the prices are double for tourist, $3000 is a decent salary in the US at least in the south, if we keep inflating prices like this it will be cheaper to stay in the US.
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 316
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Thursday, January 25, 2007 - 12:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Argentina has a vast agricultural base with many natural resources that have yet to be tapped.
It has the hightest literacy rate in South America. College education is free for those who have the academic qualifications.
Property values are, when compared with the US, much lower.
I keep hearing about the inflation rate but I have not seen any real data to support an uncommonly high rate.
Labor costs are very low for foreign investors.
Food, housing, entertainment, medical expenses, pharmacuticals, auto and health insurance are all less costly in comparison.
Living in Argentina with a US income of $3000 is in most cases 1/3 as expensive which I base on the dollar to peso exchange rate that has been relatively the same since the devaluation of the Peso several years ago.
It is a stable country that has free and fair elections.
Argentines should be proud and happy with what they have and optomistic about the future.
Sure there is some poverty but there are a lot of countries with a whole lot more.
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Steven Leslie
New member
Username: Sleslie23

Post Number: 3
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Friday, January 26, 2007 - 7:10 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the info, Tom. You definitely don't have to sell me on Argentina. It's an amazing place! So, it looks like the offer is final and I'll be arriving in BsAs in April.
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 69
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 27, 2007 - 10:48 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Steven, To answer a couple of your questions:

1. Is it easy/possible for an expat to find a non-tourist rental in BsAs? It depends upon whether you'll be able to get a guarantia from your employer. If so then that will make it easier for sure.

2. Are flights within Argentina generally affordable to Argentines? When you buy tickets with a DNI you get a better rate on your ticket, or so I've been told, Robert can you confirm. I have friends who will buy tickets for everyone in the group because if they try to buy without the DNI the price goes up.

I have a question, you keep asking about prices for Argentines. Even if you are here on a work visa, if you aren't Argentine (or in particular Porteno), expect that prices can and will be higher for you on things that people can charge you more on...ie lawn care, pool care, if you buy a used car, if you need someone to help you with paperwork, etc etc, basically anything that is not a regulated price, and that can include your rental as well.

another thing, San Isidro is not by Belgrano. It's a beatiful area in the northern suburbs of the city. It's the center seat for the San Isidro area which includes among others, San Isidro, Beccar, martinez, and Acassuso. Belgrano is in the city.

I released an ebook in December which has been getting really good reviews from my readers which details all of this information, including information about areas, how rentals work here, cost of living comparisons...right down to monthly expenses, food comparisons, etc. It's written in a mixture of guidebook and personal experience format. If you're interested in seeing the table of contents, feel free to check it out at http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
Also, my blog has a lot of info - are you bringing pets? I cover that extensively.

Good luck on your move, start planning now!! It'll be over before you know it.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 971
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, January 27, 2007 - 12:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

> Robert can you confirm?

Argentines pay 3 to 1. So a ticket priced at $300 dollars to foreigners will cost $300 pesos to an argentine. I think several different documents can be used as proof of residence: DNI, passport, cedula.

And one last contribution to Laura's. Even Portenos can get overcharged. I remember epic battles with taxi drivers using their 'piripipi' to make their clocks work faster (a tiny button hidden somewhere like behind the steering wheel to make count faster). Learn as much as you can about the word 'piola' and 'chanta', two major staples in our daily life.
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Steven Leslie
New member
Username: Sleslie23

Post Number: 4
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 28, 2007 - 7:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Laura,

I just ordered the ebook. It looks like it has a lot of good information. No pets. Just me and two suitcases at first.

I'll probably live in Belgrano/Palermo (at least at the beginning) because these are the areas of Buenos Aires that I am familiar with. Do you happen to know if it is easy to get to San Isidro from there on public transportation?
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 972
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, January 28, 2007 - 8:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes.

The public transportation system in Buenos Aires is really good. Not so much the drivers behind it, but the system itself. You don't really need a car.

From Belgrano, all you need to do is find buses that hit Cabildo Ave or Libertador Ave straight north. That's it. And from Palermo, you may have to use a combo subway/bus or subway/train.
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 70
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, January 29, 2007 - 9:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

You also have the TBA train that runs from Retiro to two stops in Belgrano and heads to the suburbs going through Vicente Lopez, Olivos, La Lucila, Martinez, Acassuso, San Isidro and then on to Tigre.
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Arial
Junior Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 43
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, January 29, 2007 - 10:11 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto, I hesitate to display stupidity on a public forum like this but I have to ask this question, the answer to which is probably obvious to all except me since I notice no one else asked. You wrote above:

Argentines pay 3 to 1. So a ticket priced at $300 dollars to foreigners will cost $300 pesos to an argentine.

Did you mean that if I am charged $300 for a ticket, an Argentine will pay the equivalent of only $100 in pesos? (3 to 1?) Do you mean that I am charged the equivalent of 3 times as much as an argentine? If I pay $300.00 US, he only pays $300 pesos, which is about 1/3 as much?

I have not been aware of this discrepancy in price. I know that tourists are charged more where possible. My son has a command of the language and I have witnessed him straighten out people trying to do that--mostly as you mentioned, taxi drivers. But I am really not sure if you mean what I think you do. Thanks for clarification. Arial
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 974
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 29, 2007 - 12:29 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Arial, you got it.

If a foreigner pays $300 dollars for a ticket, any argentine with proof of residence/citizenship will only pay $100 dollars. This is just an approximation and I should have been more precise as it depends a lot on which classes are available. The difference may actually range from less than 2:1 to less than 3:1. I think 3:1 was a stretch, sorry...

The airline companies have established different "classes" for tickets. In practice, this means that they have divided the fuselage into different sections they call classes and each of them is subject to a different price range. There is a specific class for foreigners. All airlines do this. It has nothing to do with travel agents, and all to do with a way of maximizing revenue.

So that is even clearer, when issuing a ticket with an airline company a travel agent -at least in Argentina- has to enter specific data about the passenger or else there will be no ticketing. Among the input needed is any document that serves as proof of residence or citizenship (cedula, DNI, passport). All this is very dynamic as classes can be closed or sold out and new ones may show up depending on how the selling of seats goes. Arilines (or their sophisticated software) make up-to-the-minute decisions when it comes to seating. This requires that travel agents are connected real time through specific systems to the airline companies' databases. So a true travel agent can only answer ticket inquiries by looking at the proper screen (Sabre, Amadeus, Galileo, etc) in real time.

An example, a roundtrip ticket Bue - Mar del Plata (one way) is priced as follows:

For the cheapest class (less than 2:1),
> tourist usd $102
> argentine usd $59

For the most common class (always available)
> tourist usd $144
> argentine usd $59
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Arial
Junior Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 44
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, January 29, 2007 - 6:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Wow Roberto! This is amazing. Thanks for the explanation. Can I expect a lower price as a resident? Or does this apply only to citizens?

Also, all who read these posts know my dilemma. I love Bariloche but cannot own property there without a lot of legal hocus pocus. Rent there is comparable to the US if you are a tourist and/or have no guarantor (someone who owns real estate who will guarantee your rent). One possibility I am considering is buying elsewhere as investment and renting in Bariloche, using the real estate to guarantee my own rent.

Any advice about what to expect if I do that, or tips on negotiating rent? When I return to Argentina it will be as a legal resident so long as everything goes well at the Embassy this coming Tuesday. Arial
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 975
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, January 29, 2007 - 7:09 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

First, I wish you the best of luck tomorrow. Yes, as a resident you will be able to provide your own DNI number, therefore qualifying for the lower rates. I wouldn't know how to go about your other inquiry but my general guess is that any domestic property could be used as a 'garantia'.
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Wizo
New member
Username: Wizo

Post Number: 15
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Monday, February 05, 2007 - 2:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

US $3000 a month sounds about right for a family with two kids - at least that we're budgeting on and we're moving to Argentina in March. I think we could get by on about $2000 but will have expenses that the locals wont have (e.g. travel home, etc.) $4000 would definetly be more comfortable.
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kirk Afshar
New member
Username: Love_argentina

Post Number: 1
Registered: 1-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2007 - 10:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

It is very interesting site
I am moving to argentina my plan is to stay there but not in BA .
I like to move some where south (patagonia)I speak some spanish but I have to study more.
I like to become a residence there.
if I have $15,000 can I open small business like small coffee shop or Hot dog Joint to have an income.
I really want to become an argentine citizen .I have Canadian Citizenship now.
thanks Kirk
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1034
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, March 11, 2007 - 9:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome.

That will depend on many factors. Some inland places may require a lot less investment funds to open a small shop so it is possible. But to be sure, a full, comprehensive study is needed (collecting information on all possible costs, legal, administrative, etc.)
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Robert Gisborn
New member
Username: Rgisborn

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Wednesday, October 08, 2008 - 6:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I copied this advertisement from Lanueva.com
ESTUD/Empleads, $ 350 Gral. M. Escalada 63 (alt. Sarmiento al 1000) 0291-4400920.
Does the $350 mean 350 Pesos/month? if so, this is very reasonable.
Bob
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1772
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2008 - 2:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am almost certain that is pesos. Is that a room for rent?
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Robert Gisborn
New member
Username: Bgisborn

Post Number: 15
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Friday, October 31, 2008 - 3:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

When one examines the Argentine demographics and the physical characteristics of this country, one must wonder why Argentina has not one of the greatest economies in the world. It's potential seems infinite. Yet, we see news items such as this from Clarin http://www.clarin.com/diario/2008/10/31/um/m-01792898.htm.

Why? The only answer is the lack of trust investors of the world have in Argentinians. It is sickening to see an intelligent population shaming themselves through stupid and petty scams. If a BA restaurant over charges a foreign tourist that restaurant not only loses the business of that tourist but all the potential business the tourist stops with negative recommendations. When the Argentine government grabs private retirement funds and tries to tell everybody it is an altruistic act, they're taking everyone for fools. When the government blames the rise of crime on their justice system for not putting criminals in jails that the government has not built, it makes everybody wonder who they are trying to fool. Sure, we have our share of scam in the US. But it is a lot more sophisticated.
Also, every country has crime but Argentinians seem to go out of their way to make themselves victims. Visibly stuffing some 30 grand in cash and walking about in public with it would likely get you robbed and killed anywhere. It seems to me the only root problem of Argentina is maturity.

(Message edited by admin on October 31, 2008)
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 15
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2009 - 7:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for the information on this thread. I imagine there are many different price tags depending on where you live in Buenos Aires. What suburbs/areas are known to be cheap/cheapest? My wife and I are very much used to living in "rough" neighbourhoods and so I am interested to hear of even the roughest places, and how much rent would cost for a two bedroom (groundfloor) place in those areas, and perhaps any other areas that aren't so rough but that are reasonably cheap. Is there anyone who could help with that information? If I could even find out the NAME of such cheap neighbourhoods, it could help me find more information elsewhere. Thanks.
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Living in Patagonia
Intermediate Member
Username: Soulskier

Post Number: 110
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2009 - 12:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

The peso is almost 3.5 to the dollar these days, so many things have actually gone down in value for those with dollars as of late.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1824
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 16, 2009 - 3:40 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Paco, I will say this almost as a joke to the open-minded. If you two are really, really used to living in rough areas check villa 31 in Retiro. Those guys there are living on the cheap... more like on the free, so to speak. As they don't pay rent, taxes, cable TV and none of the services. You said roughest is ok, so there you go. You get the rough and the free all in one place, if you make it to the next day.

As for reasonably cheap and still close to some of the action without having to worry too much about crime, check the neighborhoods to the west of Avenida Rivadavia (Caballito, La Matanza, Ramos Mejia). Some areas are still like the old time "barrios" with many families and are quiet and peaceful. For locals, there is that thing of (lack of) "prestige" when it comes to these area... but who cares, really. I have even seen some splendid mansions in Caballito. I think you will be surprised of some cheaper rentals here, but you have to visit a local agent and check.
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 16
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 7:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

thanks, Roberto, for your response. Villa 31 sounds quite rough, though it is still an option for us. My wife and I are missionaries and we are currently living in a rural area in Kenya, Africa. However, what you mentioned about the other reasonably cheap places without too much crime is more what we would be looking for, at least initially to get settled in. I am very comfortable with "lack of prestige". I'll try to check out rent in those areas. Any ideas on a good place to find rent prices online? I'll do a google argentina and see what I come up with. Thanks.
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 130
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 8:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hmmm, I'm not sure if Villa 31 would compare to rural living in Kenya, but Robert you're definitely right that they understand living on the cheap.

I would second Robert's feeling about Caballito - there are some great deals there and will give you the "real" feeling of living in Buenos Aires.

I have a good friend in Las Canitas who is a missionary and she's been to a lot of Villas, I could ask her what she thinks...

Laura
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Ebook Moving to and Living in Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Bill Howard
Member
Username: Veritas01

Post Number: 58
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 9:52 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

There are hundreds of smaller towns throughout Buenos Aires and Cordoba province that offer a wonderful quality of life that is less expensive than in the greater metropolitan Buenos Aires area. If you need to go to BA for any reason there is very affordable and comfortable long haul bus service from these towns. Living away from BA is generally more secure, less frenzied and again less expensive. My wife is from Punta Alta which is a town located next to the General Belgrano Naval Base near Bahia Blanca in the southern portion of BA province. About 8 hours by bus from BA. They have several nice restaurants, supermarkets, pubs, hospitals, a bus station, etc. and reasonably priced apartment and house rentals. I also stayed in Bellville in Cordoba province. A couple of hours from the city of Cordoba. Similar city in terms of size and ammenities to Punta Alta. They are lots of cities outside of BA that offer cable tv, high speed internet, satellite, etc. that keep you in sync with the world while allowing you to live comfortably on a budget.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1827
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2009 - 11:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Some great advice here...

Paco, do NOT even think about Villa 31. It was a bad joke. This is an illegal settlement laden with thugs, crime and drugs.
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 133
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Monday, February 23, 2009 - 6:57 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto, thanks for making sure to clarify about our joke on the villas for Paco ;)

Paco, I'd say the most important thing is to know the area you will be living in ie. Buenos Aires, outer provinces, etc and then from there you can do further research into affordable areas :-)
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 1
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 - 4:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

This is an amazing forum with lot of details for new visitors to Argentina.

I am Ashrit from inida. comming to Argentina,BA on work assignment from an Indian company and would be working from
Maipú, Buenos Aires (C1006ACT).
I would be in BA for 2-3 years.


I would like to know the following..Kindly help. May be Roberto can help.

1. What are the areas nearer to the above work place for safe stay at a reasonable cost. Low profile area is very much ok with me if it is safe. I would be comming with my wife and two kids. How much would be approximate rent.

2. What is the approximate school fee (& others) for KinderGarden in an English school. My elder son is 3 years old. I am planning for him.

3. What is the present tax rate for individuals on salary income.

Please advice me.
Ashrit}
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 19
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 - 5:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

thanks, everyone, for the response. It's hard to know where I will be living, because it depends a bit on the price of rent. ideally, we would want something on the outer suburbs of Capital Federal that is reasonably cheap by comparison to other parts of the city, but still accesible to the city via public transport. 8 hours away is too far! I guess I was hoping it would be somewhat like London, where you have some outer areas that are cheaper, but that you can still get into the centre of London from fairly easily via train. Is there anything like that? Would Ramos Mejia fall in that category?
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1836
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 - 8:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Paco, yes, Ramos Mejia is not that far. Neither is Caballito. Public transportation is good and reliable for the most part. It reaches every corner of Buenos Aires (city and outskirts). Buses are private, trains and subways are public. Between the three, you can get anywhere from any point in the city. You only have to be aware of traffic which can get nasty at times. But this will affect you even if you drive your own car.

Ashrit, welcome!
You didn't say which block number on Maipu, but I assume this is somewhere close to "microcentro". There are a few hotels on Corrientes and Florida that are cheap enough so that you can stay for a couple of months until you find a permanent place. This might be your best bet, close to work and close to entertainment and pretty safe. The reason to stay in a hotel and look for a place to rent while you are here, it's because you can just search classifieds in newspapers and visit real estate agents as a local. Avoid trying to secure a place online like visitors do. The price differential can be more than half! And even more if you pay cash or secure a 2 year contract.

Once in BA, try to find a real estate agent for the Palermo/Barrio Norte area. It will be close enough to your work that you can use public transportation and then close enough to restaurants/entertainment that you can enjoy quality time with your family... and a safe neighborhood.

Private school fees depend on each school but I'd say a range of u$d300 / u$d600 a month is what you are looking at. Other members here may have better/ more current information. Do not know about taxes but you should look at "impuesto a las ganancias para la cuarta categoria", I think.
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 4
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 6:22 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Roberto

Thanks for the information..Really good link. This is my first trip out side India..Slowly my fears are going away and gaining confidence after I started visiting this site. Thanks.

Is English generally understood by most of the people in BA?
I am from Asia, absolutely no knowledge of Spanish.

Regards,
Ramesh.
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 5
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 10:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

my office is
Maipú 1210, piso 6
1006 Capital Federal
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1838
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2009 - 10:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Very nice! That has to be the American Express building. I grew up -and spent almost 29 years- just two blocks from there. This is Plaza San Martin/Retiro area. If you can rent an apartment in this neighborhood you will only have to walk to work and you will greatly enjoy living there. Plaza San Martin is beautiful, you are 5 minutes away from everything and are at the heart of all public transportation system including trains that travel north.

Here, chances are many will speak english but I'd still recommend learning some spanish. You should contact my mother for tips and help. She still lives in the neighborhood and will happily assist you.

I would not know which pre-schools are good in Retiro.
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 6
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 1:04 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto..Thank you so much..My pleasure to have a guy like to give advice.

I am going to work for a company called 'ARCOR'.

I would pick up some basic words and sentenses in spanish before I come there and definetely take help from mother once I am there. I hope I can take some assistance in finding an apartment, if possible.

What would be the approximate rent (minimum 1 year and upto 3 years) for an apartment in the are you adviced, neighbourhood of Plaza San Martin/Retiro (in Pesos or USD). I am looking at 1 Bedroom, Kitchen, hall and furnished.

Regards,
Ramesh.
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 7
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Friday, February 27, 2009 - 12:11 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Also any precautions to be taken while entering into rental contract?
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1841
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2009 - 1:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

If you go through a local agent I don't think rent will be too expensive. Arcor is a very good company. It is one of the few firms that didn't sell out in the rush for gold during the Menem era where all local industry czars sold their companies to foreigners for ridiculous amounts IN DOLLARS. That was the time of the peso-dollar peg. Arcor continued to increase its exports and consolidated their business. I see their candies in Miami shelves all the time.

You should have a lawyer assist you in regards to rental agreements. The notes in an agreement may state price increases in your rent every year, in ways that circumvents what is legal. Rental prices in a contract should remain the same for the life of the contract. By law, it is not permitted to increase the rental price after a contract has been signed (this was done during a time when all contracts had clauses allowing for *indexation*, something that contributed to hyperinflation, so it was eliminated). In general, laws and regulations favor the tenant, not the landlord, so you are on the safe side. But I would still have a lawyer look at any contract you sign.

If your next question is where to find a lawyer, I would not know. But someone at your place of work can help.
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 8
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2009 - 12:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto..Thanks for the advice..I will manage lawer assistance onceWhat would be the approximate rent (minimum 1 year and upto 3 years) fo i am there..

What would be the approximate rent (minimum 1 year and upto 3 years) for an apartment in the are you adviced, neighbourhood of Plaza San Martin/Retiro (in Pesos or USD). I am looking at 1 Bedroom, Kitchen, hall and furnished.

Hope I am not irritating asking too much of details

Regards,
Ramesh
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1842
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2009 - 3:35 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ramesh, I don't have the answer... I am currently in Miami. The fastest way to get some information would be to search the internet for "alquiler departamentos Retiro". Try adding to your browser (on the latest internet explorer) google.com.ar and search directly the argentine index. You will get results in spanish and the real deal. Results will show what kind of apartments are available with pictures.

Even if you do not know spanish this is a useful exercise. You can look at places in the area and then email the guys behind the website and ask for yearly rental prices. Most argentines involved in the internet will master a level of english so you can write in english.

Here is an example of what came up in a search I just made:

http://capital-federal.enbuenosaires.com.ar/propie dades-retiro-es_AR.html

Here is a list of all results:
alquiler departamentos retiro

Your questions do not bother me.
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Ashrit
New member
Username: Ashrit

Post Number: 9
Registered: 2-2009
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 2:49 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto..Very useful links..Thanks..Wonder being in Miami for so long, still have so much of info on Argentina..

Regards,
Ramesh..
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1844
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, March 02, 2009 - 11:20 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I visit often :-)
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Victoria Teddi
New member
Username: Vikki

Post Number: 1
Registered: 3-2009
Posted on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 3:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello to all on this website. I found this by accident - it is great and very helpful. I have an immediate problem and I am hoping any of you from Argentina may have some suggestions for me. I worked and lived with a friend named Jorge Escobar here in the US (Palms Springs, California). Jorge told me so many stories about Patagonia and Plata de Marta - I believe he lives in Patagonia. Can anyone locate him for me and give him this phone number 920-634-9041. This is probably a long shot but, I thought I would try anyway. Jorge is a lovely person so any apprehension is not necessary in trying to contact him for me. Thank you so very much for any help and suggestions you may have.

Victoria
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Living in Patagonia
Intermediate Member
Username: Soulskier

Post Number: 126
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 11, 2009 - 5:02 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Victoria, can you elaborate a little more about Jorge? I live in Patagonia, but it is a really vast area. Do you know what part of Patagonia?
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 23
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 6:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Would anyone know how much the following things cost on average:

1) monthly electricity bill
2) monthly internet
3) monthly phone
4) monthly gas
5) monthly water

Even a rough figure on those things would be of great help. Thanks.
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 24
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 6:09 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

just clarifying the "gas" request above, that it is cooking gas, not vehicle fuel.
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James Guglielmino
New member
Username: Jgug1

Post Number: 22
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 9:14 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Mi amigo, Google is your friend. This article was the result of three clicks.
Internet: $65 – $145 depending on company and if you can get a special starting offer. This is for 3M high speed cable, DSL or ADSL. Also depends on the arrangement your building has with the internet company.
Phone, DirectTV and High-Speed Internet with Telefonica: $199
Electricity: $30 – $80 Could be much higher if you use electric heat or air conditioning.
Phone: $16 – $60 $16 gets you a phone line, but you have to pay to make calls. $45-$60 gets you a phone, and free calls to fixed phone lines. For calls to a fixed line, not to cell phones and not including any long distance.
New cell phone: $150 and up
Cell phone monthly payments: $20 – $80 Can be a plan or pay as you go.
Laundry Detergent: $6 for 500g
Body Wash: $8-$10 for 250 ml
Shampoo: $10 250ml Pantene shampoo
Clarín Newspaper: $2.50 during the week
Toothpaste: $3 – $10
Internet Cafe: $1.50 – $3.00 per hour
Here is the URL for this article. Try Googling "Cost of electricity in Argentina" and variations of that

http://exposebuenosaires.com/cost-of-living-in-buenos-aires/

(Message edited by admin on March 15, 2010)
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James Guglielmino
New member
Username: Jgug1

Post Number: 23
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 9:25 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am hoping that some of you who are very knowledgeable about the reality of the Argentinean situation can shed some light on whether this article is reporting truth. It is from 2008 and if true, the situation has probably deteriorated. If that is the case, it may predict an Argentina that will become increasingly unstable with immense inflation. I found this piece when I Googled for cost of electricity in Argentina.

Argentina: Electricity Prices and the Populist Retreat
July 30, 2008 | 2135 GMT

JUAN BARRETO/AFP/Getty Images
Argentine Planning Minister Julio de VidoRelated Special Topic Page
Argentina’s Economy
Argentina will raise electricity prices for residential consumers by an average of 21 percent, Argentine Planning Minister Julio De Vido announced July 30. Industrial and commercial electricity customers will see an average rate increase of 10 percent, and the extra income will be used to fund energy investment strategies.

The move is an indication that the government is being forced to compromise populist policies that have led to ever-increasing subsidies throughout the country.

Argentina’s energy crisis has become increasingly serious. The country’s declining natural gas output coupled with rising demand fully subsidized by the government has made the country more and more reliant on imported electricity and natural gas. Argentina’s electricity rates were locked into place after its 1999-2001 economic crisis. Although they began to rise a bit in 2007, prices are still four to five times lower than in neighboring countries. With 40 percent of the country’s electricity mix generated from natural gas, the decline of Argentina’s natural gas output has put the most critical infrastructure in jeopardy.

Although Argentina has managed its energy crisis up till now, the government has largely avoided resolving the situation. Energy shortages and price hikes have mainly been restricted to the industrial sector. Argentina’s reliance on popular support and populist subsidies have made protecting consumers — particularly those in major population centers — from energy shortages a priority.

Some of the costs have been passed off to natural gas export partner Chile, and some of the costs have been covered by shuffling budget money and energy supplies around the country in an effort to shield Buenos Aires from the crisis. For instance, in early July, former Cabinet Chief Alberto Fernandez used special override privileges to divert $1.6 billion from provincial coffers to import energy from Brazil.

But this kind of shuffling cannot continue forever. With mounting expenditures, rising inflation and mounting debt, Argentina’s coffers are becoming increasingly strained. By transferring some costs to the consumers, the government can relieve some of the pressure — though not enough to revive its natural gas industry — and hopefully encourage more energy conservation. But for a government that depends almost entirely on goodwill generated by well-subsidized living, raising prices could be very dangerous.

Somewhat offsetting the potential for unrest is the recently announced 27 percent raise in the minimum wage. In nominal terms, this means that the poorest of Argentines will see their electricity bills go up more slowly than their wages. The wage increase does not take into account the problem of inflation, however, which is soaring much faster than official indicators would suggest — and may even be rising faster than the wage increase. In real terms, Argentines, particularly the poor, will be less and less able to afford basic goods.

The deteriorating economic situation threatens to spark a great deal of civil unrest. And with already record-low approval ratings, Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner can only look forward to an increasingly hostile Argentina.
Gug
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 25
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 10:54 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

thanks, james, for the info. I'm not sure why i wasn't able to find it through google. It certainly does help get a picture of what the expenses are going to be like (and what kind of income i can be likely to expect).
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Pacopancho
Junior Member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 26
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 10:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

oh, james, just one question, it mentioned rent plus "garantia". Any idea how much the garantia is? I am assuming it is a six month bond or something. Is that right?
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Arial
Advanced Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 346
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 17, 2010 - 9:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I thought I would add my own experience to what James wrote about costs in Argentina . . . hoping it will help.

I am in Buenos Aires for now. My telephone is 27 pesos a month which they tell me is unlimited calls but I can't say for sure since I use Skype more than the phone so don't make many outgoing calls. Incoming calls here are without cost, which is very nice. That includes on cell phones.

For 3 meg high speed internet with Telecom I am paying $78 pesos a month, going to (as I recall) $88 pesos after six months. Both Arnet (Telecom) and Fibertel have specials on right now.

For math purposes, the peso is $3.88 pesos to $1 USD.

The Internet cafe that I frequented before getting Internet in my home, as well as another Internet place that I like a little less, are 2 pesos per hour or a little more than 50 cents USD per hour. However, there are internet places nearby that do charge $1.50 pesos per 15 minutes. I'll let you do the math.

I live in Palermo Alto which is considered a bit upscale and so one would expect prices to be a bit higher, but this is what I have found here.

As far as Argentina is concerned, the government here is crazy. They have inflation and/or a crash just about every ten years so if you decide to live here, might as well keep that in mind. It is a wonderful country with (in my opinion, at least) wonderful people. If you want to know about the economy here go and listen to this Argentine economist and you will get the picture I think. Let me know what you think. http://www.asalbuchi.com.ar. His speeches are in spanish or english, take your pick. I am currently reading a book by him.

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