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Felix Vlad
New member
Username: Felix

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 6:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Where to live in Buenos Aires...

Suppose I work in an office building on Mayo (street?) Where would a single guy, late 20s with a decent job live? I like to go out on weekends, prefer the younger/artsy/urban crowd, but am open to new things. Any suggestions? I think I'd be taking taxis/mass transit rather than driving my own car, but could do either. Any suggestions as to neighborhoods, etc? Where to people who work in the downtown area who also stay in the city tend to live?

Cheers
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 912
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 12:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Felix, Mayo Ave (or Avenida de Mayo) runs through a neighborhood called 'Monserrat' but it differs whether you will be working close to Congress or to the east side, closer to the financial district. I assume the latter.

In which case you can set up shop in the Retiro area and be at work within minutes (perhaps 15/20' with heavy traffic). Retiro and even barrio norte will be close enough to the many areas where to spend spare time and close enough to your work during weekdays.

I would worry more about being close to work than anything else as traffic/driving is a major pain. Hanging out is a piece of cake specially later at nights. You can be anywhere from Puerto Madero to Belgrano within 10 to 30 minutes (ruggero can probably make a Retiro-Belgrano drive in 5 minutes) after 9pm and city dwellers -specially your age- will start late, late, late. Doesn't matter if next day you have to be at the office. Chances are your boss has gone out as well.

I lived all my life (in BA) in Retiro so I speak from experience. Easy to go to school, work and spend time with friends anywhere.

Neighborhoods
Picture source: http://www.barriada.com.ar/mapabaires.htm
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Felix Vlad
New member
Username: Felix

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 28, 2006 - 5:57 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks again Roberto -

I'm not sure exactly where the building is, but I'd guess it's closer to the financial end.

Haven't decided if I'll make the move or not, just trying to figure out what life may be like, and probably where too look around if I travel there beforehand.

Cheers
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Paul Ghidossi
New member
Username: Chascomus

Post Number: 8
Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 07, 2007 - 9:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Felix,
A lot of people work in the city and then live in the suburbs. For instance, you can get a nice, tranquil apartment along the train rout leaving the city. The suburbs of Vicente Lopez and olivos are great traditional places to live....they are also tranquil enough to go jogging or breath some fresh air. You might like the "adventurous" style of life of the city...but it's great sometimes to get out of it and into tranquility. The train stops of Olivos and Vicente Lopez are just about 15 minutes of train ride away from the city.
A GREAT place with a younger crowd....more "hip" and fashionable these days would be Palermo Soho....and over to Las Canitas.
One thing, if your thinking of driving, realize that you will have to first get used to the way they drive here....it's messy and dangerous. I think Argentina leads the world in accidents and deaths...And also, the better models of cars are more expensive than what you would pay in the U.S.....and the registration and insurance is quite a lot!
Well, those are just a few of my opinions....good luck.
Paul, wwwhereicomeargentinacom
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Felix Vlad
New member
Username: Felix

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 07, 2007 - 10:00 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Paul!

I'm pretty sure I'd rather not drive there. I don't drive now and would prefer not to if possible. I've never been to BA, but I have seen some SE Asian and European cities - and it's truly crazy vs US or Canada. Best hire a cabbie to do the dirty work!

I'd also prefer to live in the city, but would consider the suburbs if a car isn't necessary. (Everything in walking or bus distance). So much to think about, I'm in the early phases and guess a move wouldn't happen until late this year or early next year at the earliest.

Cheers!
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 307
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Monday, January 08, 2007 - 2:48 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Paul
You can use the subway system also. It is very inexpensive and safe from what I saw.
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Felix Vlad
New member
Username: Felix

Post Number: 6
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Monday, January 08, 2007 - 7:25 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

How much are Taxis?
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Tom
Advanced Member
Username: Diverdown48

Post Number: 310
Registered: 6-2006


Posted on Tuesday, January 09, 2007 - 1:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Very cheap. A few pesos will take you a long way.

I was there last August and the fare from the international airport to downtown Buenos Aires Capital Federal, about a 45 minute drive on the toll road was 58 pesos, about $19 US.
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Arial
Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 72
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 10:16 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Are there any comments about living in the microcenter? It is near the subway, near the bus station, seems convenient to everything.

I have read that one needs to hang onto ones possessions on Florida. Is that true? Any other advice? Arial
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 78
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 10:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Felix, you probably wouldn't like the suburbs as a young single guy. The suburbs are great for families but there are far better choiches in Las Canitas, Belgrano along the Las Canitas border (both are near great public transporation), Palermo Soho (although a bit further from public transport), some other parts of Palermo near Palermo Hollywood are great as well, Puerto Madero is a possibility some great places to live there and lots of great new restaurants opening up.

My first choice would be Las Canitas as your near the parks to go running, near great public transport, grocery stores, cafes, etc. I have stayed in that area before we moved to suburbs, Ruggero has lots of places in that area for rent, and a single girlfriend of mine just moved from the downtown area to LC and is loving it.

Hope this helps, feel free to pm me if you want

Laura
Ebook - Moving to Argentina
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 79
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 10:40 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Arial,
Microcenter is nice if you don't mind all the noise and traffic. Depending upon what you like for living, you might do better someplace like Palermo Botanico or Palermo just across Santa Fe from Botanico. both are near the subte line D and easily access the city center as well as suburbs.

Yes watch your things very closely on Florida. Lots of great pickpockets to take advantage of you while people are hawking their wares to you from the stores. also, DO NOT leave your purse at your feet or on the back of your chair, ditto for bags. Keep them at your feet. I also had a guy friend who hung his male bag on a hook under a bar in front of his legs while he ate, and when he went to pay, surprise no bag...

Be very alert, oh and carry your bag on teh inside away from the streetside.

hope this helps

Laura
Ebook Moving to Argentina
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 80
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 10:41 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Felix,
forgot one other place you might like, near the American Embassy is Palermo Nuevo, great new places, also near parks and cafes, but more expensive.

Laura
Ebook Moving to Argentina
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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KEITH MANGAN
New member
Username: Kreation

Post Number: 3
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 11:04 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello all;
I'm living in Buenos Aires but am slightly confused with the Palermo issue.My wife is from Buenos Aires and she is as confused as I am.Palermo Viejo; Palermo Soho; Palermo DownTown;Palermo Nuevo;Palermo Hollywood;Palermo Chico etc....Where does one start and the other begin??? My wife insists these places never existed before , it was just palermo.Is this just developer heaven or were these names always in existance?
Does anyone have a map highlighting these areas?

Keith
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 81
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 11:40 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Keith, yes there are several areas now broken down, it's super confusing but actually most are defined by streets. Palermo Nuevo is north of the Embassy and the consulate and is now full of new high rises and lofts but easily accessible to the parks and Libertador as well as santa fe avenue. hollywood is a cool area of old 2 level "houses" as well as lots of new buildings, soho is just old and cool, very bohemian and lots of young upscale designers etc, who moved there, slowly getting gentrified. chico is WAAAAAAAY expensive and is along Libertador running up there in price with Puerto Madero. botanico is south of the embassy near the botanical gardens and zoo between Libertador and Las Heras.

hope this helps a bit more.

Laura
Ebook Moving to Argentina
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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Simon Fawkes
New member
Username: Expatba

Post Number: 24
Registered: 1-2007


Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 12:15 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Keith

Although it appears as one big swath on the map, Palermo is nowadays subdivided into a number of contrasting and individual parts, each of which are now considered as de facto neighborhoods in their own right. These divisions were primarily created by the real estate market. The main areas are:

Alto Palermo (Villa Freud)
Alto Palermo is downtown Palermo, the main shopping area and transport hub around Av. Santa Fe. At its core is the Alto Palermo Shopping Center, a large shopping mall. Villa Freud, based around Plaza Güemes, is a residential area known for its high concentration of psychoanalysts and psychiatrists, hence its name.

Palermo Viejo
Palermo Viejo (Palermo old town) is the oldest part. Bounded by Av. Santa Fe, Av. Coronel Díaz, Av. Córdoba and Carranza street, the neighborhood is centered on Plaza Palermo Viejo and reflects an older Spanish style of architecture, mixed with modern elements. Such well-known figures as Jorge Luis Borges and Che Guevara once lived here. It was historically a residential area, popular with communities from Poland, Armenia, Ukraine and Lebanon and old Spanish and Italian families, whose traditions are reflected in local restaurants, churches, schools and cultural centers.

Palermo Soho
Palermo Soho is a small area of Palermo Viejo around Plaza Serrano (officially Plazoleta Cortázar), and it is a newly-fashionable area for fashion, design, restaurants, bars and street culture. The atmosphere in many cafés and restaurants strives to be alternative, which makes this area of the city especially popular with young, upper-middle class Argentines as well as foreign tourists. The traditional low houses have been adapted into boutiques and bars, creating a bohemian feel. The square often hosts a crafts fair.

Palermo Hollywood
A newer area, Palermo Hollywood has become the media district of Buenos Aires. It is centered on the streets of Honduras and Fitzroy across the rail tracks from Palermo Viejo and, like nearby Palermo Soho, is a popular night-time destination for its bars and clubs.

Palermo Chico and Barrio Parque
Across Figueroa Alcorta Avenue, between San Martín de Tours and Tagle streets, Palermo Chico (small or exclusive) is the most upmarket part of Palermo. The Buenos Aires Museum of Decorative Arts is located in Palermo Chico in a dazzling old palatial home. Neighbouring Barrio Parque is strictly a residential area, laid out in winding streets. Many of the wealthy and famous own homes here. Once a quarter full of splendid mansions set in broad private parks, many luxury condominiums have now been built.

Las Cañitas
Las Cañitas was historically a slum area but is now an upmarket area of restaurants and bars next to the Campo Argentino de Polo in the extreme north of Palermo.

I hope this helps.

Simon Fawkes
Author, The Complete Guide To Real Estate Investment in Argentina, ISBN 1430303980, http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1430303980

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