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Adam Walker
Junior Member
Username: Adam_walker

Post Number: 34
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 02, 2007 - 7:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey Everyone!

I am from the UK and work remotely for a London firm - they are happy for me to work whever I weant, which is helpful as my girlfriend is a porteņa! I am hoping I can simply cross the boarder every 3 months to renew my Tourist/Business stamp - is this realistic, or will someone at passport control stop me?

Also, to the budding entrepreneurs on the forum - can a foreigner open up some sort of small business in Arg and employ people? My firm want me to recruit 3 people under me, and pay me whatever I need to cover the costs of running the operation, but don't want to open an office here in their name yet. I don't think I am able to do this unless I do things illegally and just pay people to work with me from my living room... any ideas on a solution?

Thanks guys
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Apartmentsba.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Saint

Post Number: 212
Registered: 5-2005


Posted on Tuesday, October 02, 2007 - 8:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Adam,

You can easily work here remotely and easily cross into Uruguay every 3 months with NO problems at all. No one will stop you or even care that you are going back and forth. Many people go back and forth monthly.

I do NOT recommend that you open up a business and work illegally. The laws here are very pro-employee so if you hired someone and they got mad at you they could turn you in. It's not worth it. Just set up a monitributo or set up an SRL or SA and work LEGALLY, especially if you are going to have employees. The laws here are crazy and even if the employee was wrong or you have a reason to fire them (they are stealing, they do something wrong, etc) they can sue you. I can promise you that if you are not set up legally you can face many problems.

A legitimate company that does things the right way can face problems with employees so imagine a totally illegal company. The government could later strip you of your right to even enter Argentina again. Is that worth it to you? Consider I know people that own legitimate and respected companies. In one situation an employee was stealing, they got it on camera and fired him. He sued the company for firing him. He caused them many problems and legal bills. Another is a friend of mine that owns a construction company. One of the workers was caught driving drunk in a company vehicle so they fired him. He also sued them and caused problems. This can be a brutal place to do business so keep that in mind.

Also, I recommend if you have employees you are paying your fair share of taxes to the government. The taxes are very high here to have employees if you are paying all the legitimate taxes you are supposed to be paying. I'm not sure of the exact percentage but for my various companies that I own here in Argentina for my employees I think for every $1 I spend i spend another 40 cents in various taxes, required benefit programs, insurance and other retirement system programs.

Talk to a lawyer and accountant and they can help set you up legitimately. Of course there are lots of foreigners working here ILLEGALLY but I advise you take the time to do it right. Argentina is a great country and it's good to respect the laws and also do things properly. JMHO. Good luck.
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Adam Walker
Junior Member
Username: Adam_walker

Post Number: 36
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 02, 2007 - 9:20 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks for this advice Saint - it is very appreciated!

From what you are suggesting, I can set up a business here even though I am a foreigner. If this is the case, i would certainly prefer this, I just wasn't sure it was possible. I had heard about the ridiculous (in my view) employment laws, it was a concern.

I hadn't realised the taxes were so high for an employer - 40% contributions! I am amazed any foreign firm invests here when Uruguay/Costa Rica offers far lower...

I am speaking to a lawyer tomorrow, but armed with your information I feel more comfortable going in.

If anyone has anything else to add about the ease of setting up these entities, please post something!
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Keith Mangan
New member
Username: Kreation

Post Number: 5
Registered: 9-2006
Posted on Tuesday, October 02, 2007 - 10:45 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Adam;
My name is Keith ; I'm 28;Irish and married to an argentine and in the same boat as yourself; working remote from BA and will be looking to hire some people.I have an apointment set up to get the ball rolling this thursday with the immigration office; hopefully they can point me in the right direction as I dont want to have to do the colonia run forever.

As I get relevant info I'll pass it on.Fingers crossed its not too much red tape.

Good luck n maybe we'll bump into each other some day.
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 95
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2007 - 8:47 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Adam, Saint is right about everything he said. The only thing I wanted to add is that you don't need to cross to Uruguay every 3 months. You can actually visit Migraciones every other time up to 2x per year essentially to renew rather than going out of the country. The process is simple and they have a specific area set up just for that.

Also, keep in mind, that you could even overstay your visa (not recommended though) and when you exit the country you'll get a *stern* talking to about why you overstayed and then be required to pay a multa or fine. When I was pregnant I couldn't leave because I was so far along and ended up going after my daughter was born. I couldn't apply for her Argentine passport UNTIL we had left the country to renew my visa and I had to pay the fine. So we ended up on a whirlwind trip to Uruguay and just spent 30 minutes there (all the boats back were full and I didn't want to stay all day with a one month old) and then came back in.
Hope this helps!

Laura
Ebook Moving to and Living in Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com
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Apartmentsba.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Saint

Post Number: 213
Registered: 5-2005


Posted on Wednesday, October 03, 2007 - 9:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Sapphos is SPOT on target with the advice given. It is true. The only part I would disagree with is (at least when I went) was it wasn't "simple". I waited in line forever at the office and it was a chaos there. I waited for hours and finally just left. I decided to take my chances at the airport as I knew surely there had to be an easier way.

There was! I didn't think the airline would notice as in my passport at the time I literally had over 60 entrance and exit stamps for Argentina. They did and they sent me to a window in the airport and I easily filled out a form, they send you to the bank office there and I paid a 50 peso fine and they stamped my passport. It was all very quick and easy. This was several years ago before I had my DNI so you should see if they still do this but I'm almost positive they do. I don't recommend you make a habit out of it but for 1-2 times it would probably be ok.

Adam - yes, the taxes are VERY high here IF you are paying all the legal taxes you are supposed to. You will find that MANY local companies here find ways to dodge taxes. I'd say a majority of them list a lower salary then what they are paying for both the employee and the employer to avoid taxes. I don't recommend this. The tax laws here are complex so if you get a company do NOT think you can do it yourself. Get an accountant that is trustworthy. By law I believe you need an accountant certifying your books every year anyway.

I pay a big accounting firm a retainer fee each month and also I had to hire 2 in-house accountants that work all day and I might have to hire another one. So, you can probably get around paying less taxes but if you are legally paying ALL the required taxes, benefit programs, payments into the retirement and disability fund, etc. It is high. Maybe it will be lower if you set up some other structure other than an SA or SRL but most serious companies are either set up as an SA or SRL.

Good luck.
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Benco
New member
Username: Benco

Post Number: 15
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Friday, October 05, 2007 - 3:21 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Adam,
you can live on a series of 3-month tourist visas and have a good time in Argentina. But you can NOT do business with a tourist visa - it is even printed on your entrance card. You could get in all sorts of trouble with migraciones, AFIP, and you might even be unable to enforce contracts in court. Setting up a corporation with only foreigners is also impossible.
I would advise to get your residency first and then start your business.
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Apartmentsba.com
Intermediate Member
Username: Saint

Post Number: 216
Registered: 5-2005


Posted on Friday, October 05, 2007 - 3:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I agree with Benco. Really if you are doing business in Argentina you should have a legal visa to be working here and if you are earning income here I strongly believe you should be paying your fair share of taxes to Argentina as well.

There are SO MANY foreigners working in Argentina and they don't have a legal right to be doing business here. Many are working out of their apartments, have no corporate or legal structure to be operating and illegally hiring employees. This just isn't right.

As Benco correctly pointed out, contracts can have serious issues being enforced if you are not here legally or shouldn't be working here to begin with. And I wouldn't hire foreigners that don't also have a DNI or working visa to be legally working in Argentina. I get several emails from foreigners every single day and many of them offer to work for free as an internship. I always turn them down unless they have a DNI.

Definitely there are good immigration attorneys that can help you get your working visa here. A few good ones like ARCA will guarantee they will get your DNI or they will refund your money.
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Adam Walker
Junior Member
Username: Adam_walker

Post Number: 41
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Saturday, October 06, 2007 - 7:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Gracias a Benco y Saint

I believe I cant get a visa here though, unless my firm has Argentine status - correct? Otherwise, i am phoning ARCA tomorrow!!

Also on Bencos point, residency - I understand I can actually get this much easier than a Visa? I just turn up to my Britsh consulate here, or somewhere else?
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WelcomeToMendoza.com
Junior Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 27
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Saturday, October 06, 2007 - 11:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

In the case of the UK, there is just the emabssy and no consulates appaarantly:
They will help you get a residency visa:

Start here and follow onward:
http://www.argentine-embassy-uk.org/version%20ingles/embassy.html

(Message edited by admin on October 07, 2007)
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Benco
New member
Username: Benco

Post Number: 16
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Monday, October 08, 2007 - 1:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Adam,
sorry, I did not want to confuse you. I was using the term residency instead of visa, but it is the same. In fact, there are three types of residency: transitory, temporary and permanent. Tourists have the transitory status, but what you need to do business is the temporary residency visa. It is typically issued for one year and can be renewed until it gets permanent. There are various categories and it is a good idea to hire an agency to help you. I know people who have done it successfully on their own, but then the process is unpredictable and you might easily waste many months. I learned that the hard way.
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Adam Walker
Junior Member
Username: Adam_walker

Post Number: 43
Registered: 4-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2007 - 6:31 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Great info Benco, thanks!

I will certainly use an agency then!

However I thought that you could only get these is an Argentine firm wanted to employ you - you are suggesting I can get one if I want to set up a business and have the necessary means (ie capital).

I also understand I can go to immigration and get the residency visa (should I already have all the documents)...

I am feeling closer now, many thaks to you all, I hugely appreciate the info!
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WelcomeToMendoza.com
Junior Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 31
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2007 - 7:12 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Don't forget the absolulty most efficient and time-savig method of getting temporary Argentine living visa (Not-tourist) is through your closet Argentine embassy or consulate in your home country. Fairly seamless and by far the cheapest, if you qualify.
The permanaent visas are only issued inside Argentina and are far easier to get if you you arrive with a temporary visa from aborad - smile throughout - always much funner!

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