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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 31
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, June 28, 2005 - 8:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

CNN showcased Brazil last night.

At least one entire section of the program was devoted to that country. Specifically, they created a short documentary with interviews to local officials with the purpose of raising awareness about what is going on down there. The statistics they brought up throughout different segments of the program were truly amazing. All in all, they portrayed Brazil as the giant in Latin America with excellent chances of becoming the permament dominant player in the region. They described brazilians as one of most resourceful groups on earth when it comes to entrepreneurial skills and they gave the impression that Brazil was vastly underexploited. Some land could be had for $100/acre (in the US you are looking at 3k/4k average).

Brazilians themselves (minister of finance) speculate that the country has entered a period of sustained growth that will last 10 to 15 years without interruptions. This belief lies on the fact that they have just entered many agreements with China that will propell their economy to new heights. It also lies on the fact that they are convinced commodities will do more than ok in the next decade. As such, Brazil will soon overcome the United States in many farm-production areas.

As an Argentine, what was truly funny was to learn that Brazil has become a net meat exporter to the United States and other regions... Imagine that.

Considering this frame of reference, could Argentina ride the commodities wave as much as Brazil might do? How has Argentina been preparing its own ground to exploit this opportunity?
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Anton Dekker
New member
Username: Anton

Post Number: 6
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Friday, July 15, 2005 - 3:04 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Roberto, not had much time to debate but can tell you that the meat market in Argentina has been seriously hit by the SOY BEAN EXPRESS!!
Many dairy farms and cattle growers switched to the soy bean instead, and cattle figures dropped significantly during the 2002/2004 period. Now beginning to recover, but it takes about 3 years to get a "sellable calf", and quite a few years more to get a "breeding cow". There was also quite a bit of cattle losses due to droughts.
So will take a while before we can ride that wave.
But our beef is still second to none, at least for those that can afford a sirloin steak!!
But again, not an expert on the matter, mainly a "consumer".
I can imagine a terryfing scenario where we will be drinking red wine with FISH!! UGGGHHH!!
Have a good one!!
Anton
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 40
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, July 15, 2005 - 4:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

> at least for those that can afford a sirloin steak!!

Hey, meat is still cheap down there. You do not want to know how much I am paying for a filet mignon here in the US. Every time I travel to Buenos Aires I make it a point to go to Ligure and engage in a meat-fest.

Soybeans have been around for a while If I recall correctly. When I was still living in Buenos Aires in the 80's Argentina was already a large producer/exporter of soybean oil through the ports of Rosario. Wasn't it? I am not surprised that this particular crop has been on the rise as far as production/exports, but replacing beef? I guess we are all becoming vegetarians...
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Anton Dekker
New member
Username: Anton

Post Number: 7
Registered: 6-2005
Posted on Friday, July 15, 2005 - 6:26 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Yes Rosario, San Martín, Quequén, etc. Cargill, Dreyfus and other major traders made big investments some years ago, specially in Santa Fe.

"Hey, meat is still cheap down there" Sure it's cheap, if you earn dollars or any other hard currency, but for us folks, who got "dedollarized" it's beginning to look like a famous tango "con la ñata contra el vidrio" (with our nose pressed against the window). Also true that soy beans have been around a while, but they were the "star of the exports" in the last 3 years. Practically displacing other crops such as wheat and corn. Big issue here, because soy beans really erode the land, and as always people here are in the "here and now" and the "Tomoro, who knows??" there could be a chance of very poor crops in the not so far future. In a sense you can't blame them. Me and my 5 year plans have helped me to keep my neck above water so far, but also missed on great opportunities.

Fancy you mentioned Ligure, used to go there with my parents. Great apple pancakes!! Use to go after watching a play at the British Culture Theatre on Suipacha. You always saw someone from the "farándula" (show biz)It still is there, and running at full steam. One of the few classics that the cyber world hasn't obliterated. Many classics are slowly disappearing. The Tortoni is one of the few cafés that still is doing well.
Well, back to work. Break time is over. Big presentation on Monday.
Best,
Anton
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 41
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, July 15, 2005 - 7:58 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

> who got "dedollarized"

I keep forgetting that, sorry.

YES, the pancakes burned with rhum were EXCELLENT. LOL. Good luck on Monday!
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Vladimir
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, November 01, 2005 - 6:36 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Does anyone know where I can find local fruit & olive price trends including current prices? Also, expected hectare production rates. Anyone, please advise. Thanks!
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 193
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, November 01, 2005 - 9:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Vladimir, do you refer to olives for oil production or olives for packing (canned or table olives)? The method of production may differ in both cases, therefore final pricing may vary. Are you looking for prices from first producers of olives as raw material or just packagers? Are you interested in a particular variety such as Arauco from Mendoza or Manzanilla from La Rioja?

Your safest bet will be to contact the corresponding federal office that tracks local pricing and production figures yearly. In the case of olives, this will be the "Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Pesca y Alimentos" or SAGPYA. They publish a "Boletín Oleícola" with prices paid to the producers for latest season. The paper also has remarks and other useful stats disclosed by variety, region, final use. The Secretary also publishes an 'Informe Olivícola' with more data. In addition, you can explore reports for previous years understanding trends and future positioning. All data/reports are going to be in spanish, most likely free. It will be up to you to collect the information and make something out of it. There may be private consultants who analyze this information the way you want to do it but will charge you tens of thousand of dollars. Finally, the "Instituto de Desarrollo Rural" runs the "Red Provincial de Precios Pagados a Productor" and also publishes papers that contain some of the information you are looking for, but very possibly, SAGPYA uses this information for their own reports. So you should focus on them.

Here is one report published by the 'Secretaria' for Aceitunas (olives). And this their website. You should also contact them for information on fruit trends and production. They are likely to have a great amount of reports/papers published. Or you can wait till someone more knowledgeable posts more precise information...
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Vladimir
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 - 6:54 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Roberto, thanks so much for your informative and quick response. I am taking about producing the olives/fruits at the finca and selling it freshly picked to the local markets. I am also looking at other fruits, such as plums, peaches, and grapes, etc. I went on the website you recommended and saw the referenced article briefly and seems to me that the prices are all up to 2001 maximum. Is there a site that has more recent information? Also, might you know a finca consulting expert that knows operations, production yields and efficient capital investments? I would like to hire one shortly to advise me on finca acquisitions in the Mendoza region. Please feel free to email me at <v.gasic@apexsoft.com>.

Thanks!
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 202
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 12:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

You may get lucky and some argentine may come across this thread and email you. You need an agricultural consultant of sorts. I do not know of anyone, unfortunately. As I stated before, the federal office posted above can provide you with updated information if you are able to contact them. They can also provide you with names of consultants for private practice.
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Arial
Junior Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 30
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 5:58 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I think that we are already in a world-wide bull market in commodities which could bode well for Argentina if laws and management within the country are favorable. Does anyone know what are the laws regarding private holding of gold in Argentina? I do know Argentina is a gold producer but wonder about buying and holding it there. Also silver. A couple of years ago I found a forum of ESL teachers in Argentina who warned Americans that the only people that survived financially in Argentina were those with a Swiss bank account and gold stored in their mattress. Which made me suspect that Argentines do (or can) own gold. Anyone have any informationa about that? Arial
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 906
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Tuesday, December 26, 2006 - 11:56 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

In my view you can hold metals fine in Argentina and I have never heard of gold ever being confiscated but land and money. Commodities may still benefit from any number of international developments... Iran (this one looks more and more like the writing is on the wall), energy/ethanol developments, etc. Storing gold and keeping money in a foreign bank would have certainly offered protection against the several financial debacles of the last 20 years, which means that you must pay closer attention if your investments are in Argentina than in other safer places and you should always have contingency plans ready.

When it comes to your money and Argentina my advice is to always consult with the big private banking guys. Not all of them have maintained offices. I think Goldman closed after 2001/2002. But you can check with Merryl and others. They might offer safer alternatives like keeping a small stash across the pond, in Uruguay.

Here is a tidbit that may be important. If there is ever a new debacle no amount of past laws will help you, as new ones will be written and executed instead. Our judiciary system is not based in the interpretation of older laws by a Supreme Court, like in "English Common Law" jurisdictions. In Argentina, laws are interpreted to the letter - as in "Civil law" jurisdictions- so as new laws come into effect they outdate the original ones. In other words, trying to understand what laws may be on your side if problems arise could just be a moot point.

** Civil law is a tradition of rules or regulations handed down by a centralized government which are to be obeyed as given, not interpreted by those charged with upholding the law. Obedience to the written word.

This is just a rough conception, of course.

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