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Carlos
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Posted on Saturday, January 15, 2005 - 5:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My name is Carlos and I have chosen to do a presentation for a course at the university I am attending about Argentina. Can you tell me or point me in the right direction to find out some things that would adequately represent Argentina? thanks.
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roberto
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Posted on Saturday, January 15, 2005 - 5:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Carlos, your inquiry is very general. If you are looking for just habits and customs that are representative of argentine culture, I'd say explore 'empanadas', 'asados', 'futbol', 'yerba mate', 'dulce de leche', 'gauchos' and 'tango'. Each of these have roots in our past and although my answer sounds trivial, all these elements have been in our history in one way or another for decades, if not centuries. However, no presentation will be comprehensive if there is no background to frame your research/investigation.

To simplify, there are two main periods in our history. Before independence, while Argentina remained a colony to Spain and afterwards. Before, it was called 'Virreinato del Rio de la Plata' and covered a period starting with Buenos Aires' foundation -in the early 16th century- and the development of main routes to alledgely riches (Paraguay) via colonization and settlements of Jesuits' missions. During this period gauchos and the basis of the 'criollo' culture developed. After independence and the conquest of the land dominated by native indians -which were massacred- Argentina entered a fast growth period which reached its peak around the beginning of the 20th century. By then, Argentina scored among the 5 richest nations in the World.

Perhaps, the most interesting period in our history and one that helps enlighten our present better, began around the 20's and has been known as the 'meat war' period (periodo de la guerra de las carnes) where foreign interests were at the center of a heated debate in Congress (look for 'Plan Pinedo' and the 3 points economic war between Argentina, US and British assets) regarding the control of Argentina's financial destiny. At the time, meat packers in the hand of the US and railroads in the hand of British institutions had a subdued effect on us, favoring only those who were in power. Studying this period -many books have been written about it- helps to understand how much of a stronghold landowners and the argentine oligarchy had at the time and to what extent influenced local politics. In addition, it helps explain the birth and evolution of the populist movement led by Juan Domingo Peron many years later, which ultimately helped him in rising to power in 1945. The peronist movement founded by him plays a key role in Argentina's history from the 40's to the present and must be fully understood. Since his coming to power, Argentina has been struggling in a chaotic swing between right and left never having been able to settle a course.

Look into some of the above and you will definitely create a rich presentation.
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Erica 429
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Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 2:35 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi my name is Erica and I am also doing a report on Argentine children in the 1930-1959 years in America. Do you have input into where i can get info on this?
Thanks for your help if you can.
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roberto
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Posted on Tuesday, February 08, 2005 - 11:19 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello Erica, I would imagine that a good source of information will be the newspapers that may have recorded information about children on specific issues. You can contact 'La Nacion' -which was founded in 1870- and ask for their archives dpt. Perhaps, there is a way to search children-specific issues.
Under the executive branch of the federal goverment there are a number of Dpts. that may have information regarding this as well. You can try contacting 'Ministerio de Educacion' at info@me.gov.ar; 'Ministerio de Salud y Ambiente' at direst@msal.gov.ar (this is the statistics dpt. and probably the first one you should try). Finally, you can contact the educational website launched by the goverment in 2003 and see if they can direct you to where the information could be. Here is their email address info@educ.ar

Here is some information regarding educational policies for children for that period:
http://www.bnm.me.gov.ar/s/proyectos/hea_sitio/lyd _textocompleto/1930-1945/p_educativas/c/ayuda_soci al.htm

Please note the citations at the bottom. There are a number of books that have been written on the subject, apparently. Here is some additional information on the impact of the new conservative government in education during that period:
http://www.bnm.me.gov.ar/s/proyectos/hea/exposicio nes/libros_lectura/1930_1945.php

In any case, the 'Biblioteca Nacional de Maestros' is probably another great place where you should direct your inquiries. Contact the researchers dpt. at bnmsa@me.gov.ar or the archives dpt. at gayos@me.gov.ar.

Hope this helps.
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Stephany
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Posted on Sunday, February 27, 2005 - 1:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

My name is Stephany and I need to write an essay on Argentinian music and dance. do you know where I can find detailled informaton about this topic. Thank you very much
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roberto
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, February 27, 2005 - 3:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome to our forums, Stephany!

It depends on what kind of music and dance you want to research about... Is this about Tango, milonga, chacarera, cumbia? Is it about comtemporary rock music, payadas or about folklore (our old native music)? Argentina is a fairly big nation with 20+ states. Each of which has its own native folklore music. Buenos Aires is known for tango and milongas, the pampas for malambos and chacareras (gaucho's dance which you can see some at gauchos).

The most important annual festival of argentine native music (we call it folklore) it is held in Cosquin, Cordoba and includes all varieties of national music. Researching Cosquin will be a good start.

Some of the most popular rock bands are:
Bersuit
Ratones Paranoicos
La Vela Puerca
Auténticos Decadentes
A.N.I.M.A.L.
Dancing Mood
Pier
Los Vándalos
Expulsados
Massacre
MAM
Via Varela
Volador G
250 Centavos
Andrés Calamaro
Intoxicados
Almafuerte
Reincidentes
Flavio y La Mandinga
Willy Crook

Some of the more traditional bands are:
Sui Generis
Los redondos
Alberto Spinetta (Almendra)
Vox Dei
Leon Gieco
Mercedez Sosa
Charlie Garcia
Astor Piazolla (bandoneon - Tango)
Pappo

If you know any spanish this is a great resource argentina rock

...There are many, many more. I will only be able to help you if you can narrow your area of interest.
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Jennifer pandolfelli
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 2:06 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi, I am doing a report on the culture of Argentina. I chose Argentina because my father is from Buenos Aires. I visited the country last year, and I loved it. So any information you can give about Argentine culture, basically the differences between the cities and the country, would be great.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 100
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, August 25, 2005 - 12:50 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Dear Jennifer, I can only give you a general overview of the country itself. Many cultural traits are being shared nation-wide. To go into details of each province or region will be beyond what I can do in this forum but I think the below lines might help a bit...

The country can be divided roughly into 6 geographical areas: the pampas, northeast mesopotamia, central region of Chaco, the high plateau of the northwest, the Andes ridge to the west and the steppe of Patagonia to the south. Within such diverse territory, you can find great differences in local habits and cultures, each shaped by their own landscapes, weather patterns and original settlers. Argentina has been subject to enormous waves of immigration throughout its history, making it a bundle of paradoxes. However, a few themes have remained constant for the entire nation. Whether you visit northern provinces, southern patagonia or Buenos Aires, you will likely encounter opinionated personalities with a tendency towards extremes and a vague indolent behaviour that defies most rules and does not accept authority on its own terms.

In general, there is a big contrast between urban and rural life. Suburbia rarely exists and proof of this is the fact that 1/3 of the population resides in the City of Buenos Aires and the Great Buenos Aires, about 13 million people. Here, dwellers are called "portenos" and perspire a somewhat european sophistication -or that is what we like to feel about ourselves- and a stylishness typical of cosmopolitan areas. The outskirts are conveniently more casual, but the city itself can make 'portenios' always wanting to "look good". Specifically in the city, you will hear animated discussions everywhere you go, if not heated debates and arguments, and you will notice that -in general- listening has taken a back seat to talking and expressing oneself with a large array of gestures. Soccer, politics and women are of the order of the day when it comes to picking up themes of conversation. But a very different picture can be seen once you travel beyond the confines of the city. Out in the country, in ranches and estancias, men and women appear more taciturn. Almost as if they have all the time that portenios seem to lack. Country dwellers will not waste words and most of the time will appear more 'hospitable'. At the 'campo' you will see a lot more 'mate' drinking. That is, yerba mate, a home-brewed tea that hides a social, binding role displayed when argentines gather together for a 'mateada'. This role of the mate is the same that the 'asado' plays, the famous argentine barbecue where locals indulge in a meat feast. Preparing the 'asado' is just a male thing and an opportunity for family and friends gatherings. But argentines -in general- are far from displaying the typical latin/macho role. Some stats are proof of this. Women today comprise nearly 40 to 50% of the workforce and more than half of the university students are women.

By nature, we are gregarious people and children remain living with their parents until they get married. If one were to choose a description for the younger generations that would be -perhaps as a reaction of years of military repression- of informality and freedom. The word family is absolutely key in every level of argentine life. Many times, cousins are best friends and in most families old and young mix well, sharing time and opinions. Almost everywhere in Argentina time has its own meaning. What can't get done today, it will be done sometime (not tomorrow). And we are never on time. Our strange habits have us dinning as late as 10 pm and going to clubs and discos at 2 or 3 am. On meetings, you will be well advised to give ample room for tardiness and if anyone ever tells you "un momentito, por favor (one moment, please)", watch out. Einstein's theory of relativity will make an impression in your brain and you will learn how elastic time can become. All this is part of a way of life. Most of us have learned that you can always sacrifice a little "efficiency" to make matters more enjoyable by sharing a conversation, a mate, a joke or perhaps some 'facturas' (pastries).

In many respects, the above cultural traits have made us a distrustful bunch to the eyes of our latin neighbors. Argentines in general, are not well respected among their peers and many latin countries have jokes that evoke these feelings, including some european nations such as Spain. And I stop here. The first installment...
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flor
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, September 11, 2005 - 5:14 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello! mi name is Florencia and i need some information about the Cosquin Rock festival in Argentina.I{m in a hurry!! please if you have information help me!!!
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 120
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, September 11, 2005 - 5:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Florencia, Cosquin festivals are typically held on January every year. Here are some useful links:

www.cosquinturismo.com.ar
www.infocosquin.com.ar
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VitaColeman
Unregistered guest
Posted on Saturday, September 17, 2005 - 9:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi, my name is Vita and I need to find some resources
in English for Argentinian Folklore music, I'm not sure what sub genre but its heard all over BA, Cordoba, Salta and Mendoza and referred to only as folklore by the locals. Any help, including the name of the sub genre would be great. Thank you!!!
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Roberto
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Username: Admin

Post Number: 127
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, September 17, 2005 - 2:40 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Vita, argentine folklore music is not the same as american folk music (just mentioning it). There are not too many pages written about this in english, I am afraid. Here is a little bit of information. In Argentina and many other countries, folklore refers to just popular/native music as a genre and it is NOT associated to one particular style. Most of the time, folklore music has a direct connection with each country's historical roots. Thus, there is colombian folklore, venezuelan folklore and such.

Typically, this music closely relates to the different regions where the different styles originally developed. Thus, folklore varies from place to place within each individual country by acquiring the 'disposition and identity' of the geographical region in question. In our country, folklore encompasses CHAMAME(litoral region), CHACARERA, ZAMBA, VIDALITAS and CARNAVALITO (center and north west), TONADAS and GATOS (west and andean region), MUSICA CORDILLERANA (patagonic region) and MILONGA, PAYADAS and TANGO (Buenos Aires and south of Buenos Aires).

For a comprehensive understanding of argentine folklore you must also explore native dances such as MALAMBO. They are part of our traditional folklore culture as much as the music styles mentioned above.

You can find some information on our site for
Malambo
More malambo
Tango
Chacarera videos
Argentine Folklore

Cosquin is by far the most important festival that congregates anything folkloric and should also be part of your research:
www.cosquinturismo.com.ar
www.infocosquin.com.ar

If I come across any other source of information I will post it here. Just in case, if you will be writing for wikipedia we'd appreciate a casual mention.
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miranda
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Posted on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 - 12:38 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello I am looking up Fun Facts on Argentina for my students.could you help? THANKS
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 172
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 - 1:03 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Miranda, what do you mean by 'fun facts'?
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RAY
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, November 21, 2005 - 6:51 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

HI I NEED TO FIND CULTURAL FACTS ABOUT MEALTIME OR HOLIDAYS THAT DEAL WITH FOOD THAT ARE DIFFERENT FROM THE U.S. SOMETHING LIKE THE FATHER MUST EAT FIRST OR ANYTHING JUST SOMETHING DIFFERENT FOR THE US
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Nicole
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Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2005 - 11:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have a project in which I'm supposed to give the audience 20 minutes worth of info that will help them if they were to go to Argentina immediately after the presentation. What are some "must know" facts dealing with meeting and interacting with Argentinians, what do/don't you discuss when making small talk, what does a person need to realize about Argentinians before moving there, what are some do's/don'ts for dining, are the people open with their feelings/opinions? Anything dealing with questions like these will help.
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Roberto
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Username: Admin

Post Number: 214
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 23, 2005 - 2:10 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ray, the only one big difference that I know of when it comes to food is that in Argentina most people dine late, sometimes even at around 10pm. We also drink more wine than the US but less beer, generally speaking. Oh, and we eat less spicy food too. Maybe someone will add something else...
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Roberto
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Username: Admin

Post Number: 215
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, November 23, 2005 - 2:23 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Nicole, my own personal opinion from my little corner is that boundaries and limits are handled differently between americans and argentines. The latter will get personal much more quickly and this will be reflected in the choice of words and body language, whereas americans -in general- are more distant and require more time before they start to open up. So it is not necessary to be awfully carefull in meetings. For anyone who hasn't visited our country before, be prepared. We are an opinionated bunch. And we are constantly judging people and situations which can sometimes get out of hand.

Yes, mostly everyone is open about feelings and for the most part we are talkative. We also dine late as I mentioned earlier and we rarely use ice cubes in our sodas. We also do not drink coffee as if it were tea, during a meal. We just drink it at the end with dessert, our espressos. In general, you could think of italians and spanish people when thinking of argentines. That will give you more clues. A reminder, the above is my own personal opinion.
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Richard Roth
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, January 16, 2006 - 1:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hey im Richard,I'm doing a brochure on Argentina and i was wondering if u knew of any web site where i could get a great Argentinian cultural fact.}
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Sandra Lowen
Unregistered guest
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 4:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hello.
I just came back from my third visit to Argentina. Here is information I think Americans would want to know who plan to visit Argentina:

First of all, I never met a more embracing nation of people. I am an African American and travel even in the United States can be of concern. I have been jeered and stoned when traveling in Europe and physically assaulted in Asia because of my race. I experienced no prejudice in Argentina.

Male and female Argentines I met greeted even new acquaintances with a kiss on the right and left cheeks. There is no sexual insinuation in this.

Some Argentine men continue to state their 'appreciation' of women aloud, which may be unsettling to American women. This has decreased substantially. Or maybe I am just ten years older...

People were very patient with my broken Spanish, which improved markedly during my visits. Despite my lack of skills, I was able to make my needs known, even when alone.

I drank mate with my friends. Not the neatly bagged mate which is served in trendier restaurants in the U.S., but the real loose stuff, sucked through a bombilla, with people saying gently, "Pase. Pase." Despite our North American reservations about passing around germs, I never got sick. It's your judgment what you choose to do if offered a mate cup. I felt honored at being offered mate. I felt it was a sign of being accepted by my hosts.

In my opinion you will never get tastier coffee than you will in Argentina. And while I usually go no higher on the food chain than fowl, I eat beef in Argentina, because it is beyond compare.

The only difficulties I had were with driving and smoking in public areas. To quote a guidebook I read, "All Argentines smoke. But few die of lung cancer. They get killed in car accidents first." I spent a lot of time gripping taxi seats and transit bus poles for dear life, as whatever vehicle I was in careered through public streets. (Remarkably I never witnessed even a fender-bender, but I turned down my opportunity to get an international license!) As an asthmatic who is allergic to cigarette ash I suffered the first time I visited the nation. I noticed this last time, however, that some restaurants are instituting 'no smoking' areas, and advertisements about the risks of smoking are beginning to appear on billboards. I might also add that sidewalks badly need to be repaired, and I came close to wrecking my ankles more than once.

Although I understand the social system is changing, I felt a lot safer on the streets than I might in a North American big city. Naturally one observes sensibility -- one does not flash jewelry or money, and one avoids deserted areas at night, just as anyone would do anywhere else.

Currently the dollar is worth almost three pesos, and money goes a long way. I had a lot of fun eating out and shopping, though I had a little trouble locating souvenirs that were authentic and not 'touristy'.

Buenos Aires is an easy city to get around, with a subway system that travels to the major places tourists want to visit.

Again, the above is my own personal opinion.
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Sandra Lowen
Unregistered guest
Posted on Monday, March 06, 2006 - 3:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Test
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Christie Perri
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Posted on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 6:30 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I am doing a paper on the "Branding" of Argentina. For America, it's the land of freedom, NASA, Hollywood ect.. What is Argentina seen as, as a nation and how do they see themselves? How does the country represent or market itself?
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 403
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 7:07 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

A quick reply...

For sure we are the 'land of Tango and great steaks' but a less known fact is that we believe we are also a 'piece of Europe in South America'... That probably tells you something.

You might be better off starting a whole new thread on the subject.

(Message edited by admin on April 21, 2006)
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adaryuichi
Unregistered guest
Posted on Sunday, May 07, 2006 - 2:06 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi my name is Ada and I am doing a report about Argentine's interpret

system... Do you know where i can get informetions about this?


Do the interpreter have the welfare or armor or code of conduct?

Are there have a accsociation of interpreter?

How about the price if they do an interpretion well done or not?

sorry this is my first time ask question at here

Thanks for your help very much..
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 427
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, May 07, 2006 - 11:55 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Welcome, Ada.
I am not sure I understand your inquiry. Do you want to know if there is a trade association that gathers 'translators'? If so, translating from and into what language? Or are you refering to live transcribers?

(Message edited by admin on May 07, 2006)
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adaryuichi
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

sorry~I want to know what Argentina does have the interpretion organization and the interpreter have any code of conduct?
thank you
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 435
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 - 5:13 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Check this link
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Administrator
Unregistered guest
Posted on Friday, May 12, 2006 - 7:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Test
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Nathanael Dunlevy
New member
Username: Ndunlevy

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, October 09, 2007 - 9:53 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm looking for information on the culture of the Criollos of Northern Argentina. Specifically, ways in which they differ from the porteno of BsAs and the more meztizo or native peoples they share the north with. I speak Spanish, so spanish resources would be useable as well. Thanks!
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1350
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, October 18, 2007 - 3:38 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Nathanael, sorry for the delay... This is an interesting topic not heavily researched or talked about. Possibly because of the underlying discrimination. I myself could not find much and I would not want to issue any opinions either. But I did find some discussions that may offer you some hints at:

http://www.mestizos.net/foros/viewtopp.443-0-asc-1 5.html

And here is an interesting article published at Iruya (local) that raises this same issue.

http://www.iruya.com/content/view/33748/140/

I am afraid you will not find much published since this is too controversial.

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