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Kenneth Wade Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 1
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Tuesday, May 26, 2009 - 2:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi everyone, I've been researching retiring overseas for awhile now and really like what I'm reading about Argentina. While I'm sure I'd visit Buenos Aires on occasion I would prefer a smaller city, preferably with a good selection of movies and buffet restaurants. I'd like to live where the air is dry, near mountains, and is affordable. I'm considering the areas around Salta, Cordoba, and Mendoza. San Rafael sounds great, and I was wondering if there are similar towns where bikes are used so much? Do you find a large difference in the cost of living between the bigger cities and smaller places? Are there any places you'd recommend I look at that might be off the radar of most retirees? I'm curious about Tandil, sounds nice in tourguides. Thanks for any assistance, opinions welcomed!
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WTMendoza.com
Advanced Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 460
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 - 8:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi Kenneth, I reccomend you check out the cities of Mendoza and San Rafael in the Mendoza province, and the areas surrounding these two cities. If you want sunny and dry, Tandil will be a killer, especially on the humidity.

San Rafael is farther from the mountains and gets more hail, then Mendoza city and suburbs.

Costs: if this is a factor for you, you may want to reconsider - Argentina can be cheap and expensive in the same decade!

Good luck!
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 2
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 27, 2009 - 10:43 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Appreciate the insight! I've been reading this site and am beginning to wonder if I'll be able to afford it. I'm hoping U.S.$1100 a month at 55 will get me by until I get Social Security at 62. I'm 47 now so will have some savings to supplement my pension. If it's not doable I'll look at a cheaper country until I'm 62. I really like how bikes are an accepted part of local transport in San Rafael. With limited funds I'll do without a car.
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Living in Patagonia
Intermediate Member
Username: Soulskier

Post Number: 144
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Friday, May 29, 2009 - 12:37 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I lived outside San Rafael for a couple years. It is definetly one of the least expensive places in Argentina to live. And yes, bikes were the mode of transpo.
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 3
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Friday, May 29, 2009 - 10:17 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

That's good to hear! Are you the lady in Bariloche who gave up vegetarianism because the Argentine beef is so good? If so enjoyed reading your blog the other day!
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Living in Patagonia
Intermediate Member
Username: Soulskier

Post Number: 145
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 30, 2009 - 9:12 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

No, I am the man with no problems eating meat!
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WTMendoza.com
Advanced Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 462
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Saturday, May 30, 2009 - 11:43 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Historically the USD holds well in Argentina, making it possible for USD holders and earners to have more purchasing power than living on local wages. The worse time it gout out of hand was 1997 to 2000 when things got real expensive in dollars, just before the super crash.

Going forward, with all the doom and gloomers saying the dollar will collapse, it's anyone guess from here.

I personally think thinks will remain more or less par, just make sure you have backup funds to rely on here, there, or wherever you are. And you will enjoy things much more if you start your advanced Spanish now! Cheers!
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 4
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Saturday, May 30, 2009 - 7:36 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

For L-I-P: Oops, sorry about that! Since you lived there, anything negative about San Rafael I should be aware of besides hailstorms? They must be pretty bad as I've seen mentions of them in several places. If I can get satellite tv and good internet I can live about anywhere. I'm not a wine afficiando but for purely health reasons having a glass with meals is probably a good idea. So riding a bike everywhere and having a glass of wine a day sounds pretty normal in San Rafael. I live in Tyler, TX which is a "dry" city alcohol wise and you can get run over on a bike here in a matter of minutes. Here for work and probably won't leave until retirement but I'm a fish out of water here! One thing I'm wondering about. I plan to find a wife in the Philippines when I retire. Are there any sizeable Asian communities in Argentina where she might be more comfortable? I know people will say why not find an Argentine wife? As I'll be in my 50's and would like to meet someone young enough to have children, the Philippines appears to be my best bet. Just wanted to get that out of the way, I'm always asked that. :-)

WTMendoza: My company terminated our pension plan, giving me about $8k-$9k less than I would've gotten. I know I can't count on Argentina staying cheap, and I wouldn't wish on them another Peso crisis, but after comparing it to other countries in South America and Southeast Asia, I sure hope it stays reasonably affordable. I like Chile too but can't afford it other than Arica. The way the U.S. is spending money I'm concerned that serious inflation is around the corner, and my $13k pension will be nearly worthless. I'll be stuck in the U.S. working until I drop. Hopefully not, but it's a concern.
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Bill Howard
Member
Username: Veritas01

Post Number: 66
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 31, 2009 - 1:33 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

In 2000, at the age of 50, I met my wife to be in Argentina. We were married in 2002 and we had a son in 2007. I have traveled to Argentina on several occasions and spend a great deal of time in smaller cities and towns. I like the coastal areas of Argentina. Particularly Bahia Blanca in the south. Nice size city. Good infrastructure, shopping, restaurants, parks, entertainment. A university and port city. Close to some good beach towns particularly Monte Hermoso. It is about 8 hours south of Buenos Aires by bus. The cost of living is considerably less than in BA. If you can live modestly in a small apartment and eat in most days you should be able to live comfortably. Start up costs and health insurance are an issue. Medicare is not usable out of the US. Drugs are much cheaper however. Satellite TV will give you a good lineup of English channels but regular cables offers some in English as well. High speed internet is available everywhere. Argentina was incredibly cheap 4-5 years ago right after the crisis. However, it is still fairly cheap and I would suggest for a small pension you would live better in Argentina than the USA. My sister-in-laws probably don't make that much and they manage. Nothing fancy but they live well. Wine is cheap particularly if you are not fancy about it like me. As cheap as 2 dollars a bottle or milk carton full. I have seen an increase in asians in BA but in small towns an asian (like a big tall heavy blond american like me) will stick out a bit. But I dont think it would be a problem. I also would guess there would be many Argentine women who would love to marry a good man particularly those with children from a previous marriage. Just learn some spanish, convert to Catholicism and figure out how to dance like a latino and you will be all set.
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 5
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Sunday, May 31, 2009 - 9:59 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Bill for the very good info. If I have to dance to attract a nice lady there it'll get pretty lonely! Another reason I'm heading to the Philippines is they speak English. I'm going to work hard on the Spanish but I'm wondering how fluent I'll ever get. Obviously I've got a ways to go and no telling what conditions will be in 8 years. What I'm reading here is Argentina is affordable on a tight budget within reason. If I see continued posts of increasing costs it'll most likely mean I've been priced out of living there. Thanks again everyone for the good advice. Hope to join you down there someday!
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Living in Patagonia
Intermediate Member
Username: Soulskier

Post Number: 147
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Monday, June 01, 2009 - 10:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

KK, there is a large asian population in Belgrano, Buenos Aires.

The only other negatives we encountered in San Rafael was it was a little behind the times and had fairly basic restaurants, at least for our tastes.
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 6
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Tuesday, June 02, 2009 - 1:15 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Ran across this today, hope it's ok to post:

http://www.howmuchabroad.com
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 13
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Sunday, July 12, 2009 - 10:39 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've discovered that if you plug the name of a city, the country, and the word movies into Google Search it'll bring up showtimes for that city if there's a participating theater there. Leave out the commas. Doing this I discovered San Rafael only has 3 screens. I've looked at a bunch of cities since and it appears that San Luis with 8 screens is the champ for cities it's size. It's interesting how current movies in English are widely available there. Might be kind of dumb to some but I enjoy going and having movies in English should help with culture shock. I'm liking what I'm reading about San Luis. It's kind of in the middle of things so good for trips. Any opinions on San Luis as a place to live greatly appreciated!
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Living in Patagonia
Intermediate Member
Username: Soulskier

Post Number: 159
Registered: 9-2008
Posted on Sunday, July 12, 2009 - 10:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

So you are considering moving to an area based upon movie theaters?
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 14
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Sunday, July 12, 2009 - 11:28 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

No, but it certainly will put it on the list of places to check out. Guess I could follow the crowds and live where it's considered hip.
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1881
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Sunday, July 12, 2009 - 11:56 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Kenneth, I researched San Luis for a business venture about 1 1/2 year ago. It is a surprisingly well run province but it suffers some of the problems most provinces have, which is -compared to Buenos Aires- it is awfully slow. I think the option of living in places like San Luis will rely entirely on your definition of "patience" as time gets stretched quite a bit. San Luis has a very nice vacationing area in the northeast portion called Merlo. People are accessible and look to the future but there will always be a gap with what you can see in cities like Buenos Aires. I also think you should consider many of these provinces had been run by the same families for decades or more and there is extensive red tape.

Other than the above, San Luis has one of the most beautiful offices in Buenos Aires -Casa de San Luis- that is worth visiting.
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 15
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Monday, July 13, 2009 - 12:26 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Roberto. I've looked at Merlo in Google Images. Certainly a beautiful area. 20 years ago I spent time in New York City and Seattle. Big cities are interesting to visit but I prefer something about 100,000 to 150,000. I'm hoping to visit in a couple of years to get started on this. I've read that San Luis has good fishing nearby, another plus. I may make an exception for Salta, really find the NW fascinating. Apparently it's the only part of the country with spicy food. I know Buenos Aires is a world class city in many ways but I found out living in Santa Fe, NM that it doesn't matter how much an area has to offer if you can't afford to participate. I'm hoping a nice but off the beaten track place will be much more affordable and allow me to visit some of those other nice places. Guess my biggest concerns are that it's not a heavy industrial town, has good internet, decent weather.
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WTMendoza.com
Advanced Member
Username: Welcometomendoza

Post Number: 466
Registered: 7-2007


Posted on Monday, July 13, 2009 - 6:37 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

LOL i know it sounds funny about the movie theaters but I can see that being a factor. Certain comfort things are important. I have some relocation clients that go to the movies every weekend they can - they really enjoy it. Anyway, consider this my plug for Mendoza, if you like sunny dry weather, mountain activities just an hour or so away, and hey, why not throw a dash of wine country in the mix if you are into it. Cheers
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Bill Howard
Member
Username: Veritas01

Post Number: 68
Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 - 3:53 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

I have always liked Bahia Blanca a port city in the southern portion of Buenos Aires province. Decent sized city with good infrastructure. Bus station, airport, university, Walmart, shopping center, movies....good restaurants, shops, parks, clubs. The cost of living is a bit less here and it is close to Monte Hermoso and reasonably close to Nechochea and Mar del. About 7-8 hours to BA or Cordoba. Hospital is good. Crimes seems average to low. As most everywhere high speed internet and english language satellite is avaialable. All in all a good choice.
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Kenneth Kilpatrick
New member
Username: Vanman

Post Number: 16
Registered: 4-2009
Posted on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 - 10:08 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

WTMendoza: Something I've wanted to ask you. Although Gran Mendoza is about 900,000 to 1 million, I noticed Mendoza itself is about 130,000. That surprised me as I thought it was a big city. So is it endless suburbs or is it spread out enough that each town is unique and seperate? Other than some increase in crime I can't find anything but praise for Mendoza. Being able to make a quick run to Chile to renew a tourist card is certainly a plus. Is being close to Chile an influence on costs? Thanks!

Bill Howard: Thanks Bill. I've read your other posts on that area and if you're that positive on it I will definitely check it out! I think my first trip to Argentina will involve alot of busses. I'll consider the coast as long as there's good sea breezes. I was raised in central Florida and am currently in east Texas. I can't envision a great retirement in sweltering humidity.
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Pacopancho
New member
Username: Pacopancho

Post Number: 21
Registered: 5-2008
Posted on Monday, March 15, 2010 - 6:01 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Hi everyone,
I am thinking of moving to Argentina with my wife towards the end of the year and we are considering whether to move to Buenos Aires or Cordoba and would like to weigh up the cons and pros of each.

Does anyone know any good sites for checking rent prices (of unfurnished places - I seem to only find places that are already furnished and obviously more expensive) for both Buenos Aires and Cordoba?

Any help with that would be appreciated. Thanks.

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