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Eric Northam
New member
Username: Enortham

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 7:59 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I've noticed that most people seem to be using an immigration attorney to obtain their visas. I'm looking to obtain a rentista or business visa and was curious if anyone has any experience obtaining either on their own.

I'm close to the consulate in Washington D.C. and the steps on their website appear straightforward. Of course nothing, especially in government offices, is as easy as it seems and I can also only seem to talk to the voicemail box at the consulate.

Also any idea how long it would take to process either visa?

Some consulate visa links with the steps:

http://www.embassyofargentina.us/espanol/seccionco nsular/privateincomeretireevisa.htm

http://www.embassyofargentina.us/espanol/seccionco nsular/tourist.htm
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 63
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 9:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Eric, it is possible to get the visas on your own, but be forewarned of the major headaches and time you'll spend doing it. A rentista visa is the easier of the two to get. Where you're going to have slowdowns is once you're here in Argentina and need to get paperwork processed - you often have to make repeat trips, have the door shut in your face because they have the "max number of people they'll see for the day", etc etc. But if you're up for doing that then go for it.

To do a business visa is a much bigger undertaking. I have a friend, and granted he's from India which inherently causes additional problemes, he has spent almost a year trying to get his business visa to open an Indian restaurant. They have repeatedly sent him away to rework his business plan saying that the rules have changed, or that something wansn't right with the translation (yes you have to translate your entire business plan into Spanish by translators they approve), he was missing paperwork etc. He has spent a lot of money doing his own visa but decided to stick it out because he had friends here who helped him. But it certainly has been a long and expensive road.

Don't know if this helps or not. Good luck with everything.

Laura
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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Eric Northam
New member
Username: Enortham

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 9:51 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Thanks Laura for your reply and for a great blog. Just as a side note, I've heard that it is generally easier to obtain a visa outside of Argentina.

I did finally get through to the consulate in D.C. and unfortunately the lady I spoke to wasn't that helpful. She just told me to contact the US embassy in Argentina for guidance. She wouldn't provide any other suggestions or recommendations. She did mention that it should take about three weeks to process the rentista visa.

Thanks again,

Eric
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Arial
New member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 25
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 10:30 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

Eric, I have a hard time believing that a "rentista" visa could ever be done in three weeks. I am doing the retiree one (on provable retirement income) which is supposed to be the easiest.

I don't even want to try to tell you all the problems I have had. This could not have been done from Argentina. For example, if you get a police letter that you are not a criminal, and the police department notarizes your signature when you didn't even sign the document--in other words they write that (your name)appeared before me and signed the document, rather than the name of the officer that did the search, and you get it back in Argentina like that, what do you do? You would be pulling your hair! I was pulling mine and I was right here and could return to the police department. I finally wrote out the letter, including the notary information at the bottom, wrote in what belonged there in ink on the lines and then took it back to them so sweetly, gave them a few compliments about their patience with ME and nursed them through the process.

I have several of these stories to tell you but I will let that one suffice. Some were nearly irresolvable but the Secretary of State people here in Florida gave me some hints. I had made about 3 calls there before I happened to get the guy with enough experience that knew how to help me. I don't know about you but for me this is SO stressful. The frustration. I can't imagine doing that from Argentina. How would you ever do it? I dare say it would take a year or longer to send things back and forth until you got it right.

My attorney had a power of attorney signed by me there and so could speak for me with immigration in Argentina and they took all my papers to the officials there (faxed copies) for preapproval which helped a lot. And they did find some glitches that they would not have approved. I am a widow and Argentina could not understand why my last name on my passport is one thing and my birth certificate another. As a guy you wouldn't have that challenge but what an ordeal--for me emotional as well as time consuming. They wanted both documents to have the same last name! My attorney in Argentina finally got that resolved (but not without some additional steps by me here).

Perhaps I am the exception. Others might have had a different experience. If you were going to try it though, I think perhaps you could do it better from here than from down there. If you run into snags I might can tell you how I was able to resolve mine. But then they might not be the same issues.

The immigration attorney is expensive. Mine will cost about $1200. So you have to decide how much frustration is worth doing it yourself. If others disagree with me, please feel free. I am interested in the experiences of others as well. Arial
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 64
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 11:07 am:   Edit PostPrint Post

I'm also surprised about the 3 week timeline. No way do I believe that one. It is also a fact that you're SUPPPOSED to do all your visa work before heading to Argentina.

Arial, I'm not surprised at your problems with your name. Our friends are Argentine wife and American husband and his name on his passport was missing his middle initial that was on his birth cert. They made him go to the American Embassy and get documentation that he really was who he was.

Also, I'm trying to be careful, because with our daughter due next week, we have to make sure to register her birth name very carefully or we'll have a horrible time after as well.

Anyway, for both of you good luck with everything!


Happy holidays everyone!!!
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Arial
Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 87
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2007 - 3:55 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Esta la dia para la fiesta!!!!!!!

I was looking for all the conversation about visas but this site is growing and I cant find it but perhaps this place will do.

I have my DNI in hand! The end of a long and arduous journey! Now I have to return to the US because of illness in my family but . . . as a famous general once said . . . I shall return!

Arial
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larry Rogers
Junior Member
Username: Larryr30

Post Number: 38
Registered: 6-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2007 - 5:01 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Arial,
Upon your returning to Argentina, I would love to hear personnally what it was that you had to go through inorder to obtain your DNI...tricks of trade I guess you could say. Maybe, not sure if your in the Buenos Aires area, we could get together for some cafe; if not something like that, maybe just a private conversion so that I can get a grip on some needed information without havving to search day and night.

Thanks,. and best with the family, I just returned to the States for a similiar reason and Im glad to be back here in Argentina once again!
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Arial
Member
Username: Arial

Post Number: 89
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2007 - 6:27 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Larry, I am not sure how long before I will be back in Argentina. My mother has cancer and is not going to be treated because of her age so I am not sure what lies ahead. It is a reoccurrence so been through it before. But whether here or there I am happy to pass on any information that I can. You can write me off forum if you want though probably I will not answer until sometime next week. I went under the Jubilado (retiree) so it will depend on what you plan to apply for. There are others on the forum who have obtained different types of visa, one of my relatives is looking into a different visa so it is almost certain someone here can help you. It is true that information is often hard to come by--which is one beauty of this forum. Arial
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movingtoargentina.typepad.com
Member
Username: Sapphos

Post Number: 88
Registered: 2-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2007 - 7:41 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Arial,
I'm very sorry to hear about your mother, I wish you strength for the journey that lies ahead and good energy for your mother.

Also, congratulations on your dni although I'm sure it's a bit bittersweet with all that is happening, but I'm happy to see you've finalized this part so you can go home and be with your mother.

Laura

Moving to and Living in Buenos Aires, Argentina Ebook
http://movingtoargentina.typepad.com/ebook
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Roberto
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1098
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2007 - 2:44 pm:   Edit PostPrint Post

Arial, we wish you all good things in Argentina! And a pray for your mother.

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